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The following question is about a caching framework to be implemented or already existing for the REST-inspired behaviour described in the following.

The goal is that GET and HEAD requests should be handled as efficiently as requests to static pages.

In terms of technology, I think of Java Servlets and MySQL to implement the site. (But emergence of good reasons may still impact my choice of technology.)

The web pages should support GET, HEAD and POST; GET and HEAD being much more frequent than POST. The page content will not change with GET/HEAD, only with POST. Therefore, I want to serve GET and HEAD requests directly from the file system and only POST requests from the servlet.

  1. A first (slightly incomplete) idea is that the POST request would pre-calculate the HTML for successive GET/HEAD requests and store it into the file system. GET/HEAD then would always obtain the file from there. I believe that this could easily be implemented in Apache with conditional URL rewriting.
  2. The more refined approach is that GET would serve the HTML from the file system (and HEAD use it, too), if there is a pre-computed file, and otherwise would invoke the servlet machinery to generate it on the fly. POST in this case would not generate any HTML, but only update the database appropriately and delete the HTML file from the file system as a flag to have it generated anew with the next GET/HEAD. The advantage of this second approach is that it handles more gracefully the “initial phase” of the web pages, where no POST has been called yet. I believe that this lazy-generate-and-store approach could be implemented in Apache by providing an error-handler, which would invoke the servlet in case of “file-not-found-but-should-be-there”.

In a later round of refinement, to save bandwidth, the cached HTML files should also be available in a gzip-ed version which is served when the client understands that. I believe that the basic mechanisms should be the same as for the uncompressed HTML files.

Since there will be many such REST-like pages, both approaches might occasionally need some mechanism to garbage-collect rarely used HTML files in order to save file space.

To summarise, I am confident that my GET/HEAD-optimised architecture can be cleanly implemented. I would like to have opinions on the idea as such in the first place (I believe it is good, but I may be wrong) and whether somebody has already experience with such an architecture, perhaps even knows a free framework implementing it.

Finally, I'd like to note that client caching is not the solution I am after, because multiple different clients will GET or HEAD the same page. Moreover, I want to absolutely avoid the servlet machinery during GET/HEAD requests in case the pre-computed file exists. It should not even be invoked to provide cache-related HTTP headers in GET/HEAD requests nor dump a file to output.

The questions are:

  1. Are there better (standard) mechanisms available to reach the goal stated at the beginning?
  2. If not, does anybody know about an existing framework like the one I consider?

I think that a HTTP cache does not reach my goal. As far as I understand, the HTTP cache would still need to invoke the servlet with a HEAD request in order to learn whether a POST has meanwhile changed the page. Since page changes will come at unpredictable points in time, an HTTP header stating an expiration time is not good enough.

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and the question is... )) –  Osw Mar 29 '12 at 10:29
    
Perhaps you could be more clear about how your proposed architecture is in any way different than placing an HTTP cache in front of your server(s). It doesn't sound like it, on the surface. –  fumanchu Mar 29 '12 at 14:46
    
The questions are: 1: Are there better (standard) mechanisms available to reach the goal stated at the beginning? 2: If not, does anybody know about an existing framework like the one I consider? You ask why do I think that a HTTP cache does not reach my goal? – As far as I understand, the HTTP cache would still need to invoke the servlet with a HEAD request in order to learn whether a POST has meanwhile changed the page. Since page changes will come at unpredictable points in time, an HTTP header stating an expiration time is not good enough. A HTTP cache would suffice if the servlet servin –  Bernhard Bodenstorfer Mar 29 '12 at 20:02
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1 Answer

Use Expires HTTP Header and/or HTTP conditional requests.

Expires

The Expires entity-header field gives the date/time after which the response is considered stale. A stale cache entry may not normally be returned by a cache (either a proxy cache or a user agent cache) unless it is first validated with the origin server (or with an intermediate cache that has a fresh copy of the entity). See section 13.2 for further discussion of the expiration model.

http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html

Conditional Requests

Decorate cache-able response with Expires,Last-Modified and/or ETag header. Make requests conditional with If-Modified-Since, If-None-Match header, If-*, etc. (see RFC).

e.g. Last response headers:

 ...
 Expires: Wed, 15 Nov 1995 04:58:08 GMT
 ...

don't perform new request on the resource before expiration date (the Expires header) and then perform conditional request:

...
If-Modified-Since: Wed, 15 Nov 1995 04:58:08 GMT
...

If the resource wasn't modified then 304 Not Modified response code is returned and the response doesn't have a body. 200 OK and response with body is returned otherwise.

Note: HTTP RFC also defines Cache-Control header

See Caching in HTTP http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec13.html

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