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An application specific example to illustrate my immediate problem:

I have a metadata provider class with the following (abridged) interface:

public class CtsDataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider : DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider
{
    protected override ModelMetadata CreateMetadata(IEnumerable<Attribute> attributes, Type containerType, Func<object> modelAccessor, Type modelType, string propertyName)
    {
        var metadata = base.CreateMetadata(attributes, containerType, modelAccessor, modelType, propertyName);
        return metadata;
    }
}

Now I would like to extend ModelMetadata with additional properties, populate these and return and instance of ExtendedModelMetadata. How can I nicely convey properties assigned to the metadata instance by base.CreateMetadata in my extended instance? What I would like but don't have is;

var metadata = (ExtendedModelMetadata)base.CreateMetadata(attributes, containerType, modelAccessor, modelType, propertyName);

I can create a constructor for ExtendedModelMetadata that takes a ModelMetadata parameter and explicitly assigns all of it's properties to the instance being constructed, but I would like a more generic and less hard-coded approach for this. What can I do?

share|improve this question
    
I know this post is quite old, but I was in a similar situation and found a solution to what you were trying to do, check the answer if you're curious: stackoverflow.com/questions/16627312/… – ppetrov May 21 '13 at 21:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use AutoMapper to achieve this.

Mapper.CreateMap<ModelMetaData , ExtendedModelMetadata>();

.NET Framework does not provide a deep copy feature.

share|improve this answer
    
I am already using AutoMapper, and love it, but I would prefer something without a non-.NET dependency. I implemented a very neat and quick interim AutoMapper solution and may just stick with it though. – ProfK Mar 29 '12 at 12:59

You can use reflection and generics (this is a cheap, home-grown example that copies all fields, it makes quite a few assumptions for the sake of brevity):

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Base b = new Base();
            b.Number = 42;

            Derived d = Copy<Derived, Base>(b);
            Console.Read();
        }

        static TDerived Copy<TDerived, TBase>(TBase b)
            where TDerived : TBase, new()
        {
            TDerived d = new TDerived();

            var bType = typeof(TBase);
            var bFields = bType.GetFields(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
            
            foreach (var field in bFields)
            {
                object val = field.GetValue(b);
                field.SetValue(d, val);
            }

            return d;
        }
    }

    class Base
    {
        public int Number { get; set; }
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

This assumes that the type has a default parameterless constructor, but you get the idea.

Alternatively, if performance is an issue you could do something like create a code generator that code-gens the assignment code using partial classes.

share|improve this answer
    
That is what AutoMapper does. – Aliostad Mar 29 '12 at 10:47
    
@Aliostad Didn't know that, never used AutoMapper. I was coding this as you posted your answer. Personally for something this small I'd roll my own to avoid taking a dependency. – Adam Houldsworth Mar 29 '12 at 10:48
    
@Aliostad Well in this case I might just lift the code straight out of Auto Mapper if it isn't too dependent on other internal stuff. But I'd still avoid the dependency on an ORM framework for something as simple as copy constructors. – Adam Houldsworth Mar 29 '12 at 10:52
    
This will handle deeper dependencies, for example if you have nested class hierarchies... and it is small. But again everyone will make their own choice. – Aliostad Mar 29 '12 at 10:58
    
@Aliostad Yes I can imagine it works entirely, whereas my 5 minute example of what could potentially be done doesn't... lol – Adam Houldsworth Mar 29 '12 at 10:58

I would split out creation and population if possible.

public class CtsDataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider : DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider
{
    protected override ModelMetadata CreateMetadata(IEnumerable<Attribute> attributes, Type containerType, Func<object> modelAccessor, Type modelType, string propertyName)
    {
        var extended = new ExtendedModelMetadata();
        PopulateMetadata(extended, attributes, containerType, modelAccessor, modelType, propertyName);

        return extended ;
    }

    protected override void PopulateMetadata(ModelMetaData data, IEnumerable<Attribute> attributes, Type containerType, Func<object> modelAccessor, Type modelType, string propertyName)
    {
         base.PopulateMetaData(data, attributes, containerType, modelAccessor, modelType, propertyName);

        //populate extended properties.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like that. I had already implemented this strategy with an AutoMapper based population method as an interim solution. – ProfK Mar 29 '12 at 12:57

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