Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using external process which writes short line of output for each chunk of data processed. I would like to react after each of these lines without any additional delay. However, seems that .outReceived() of ProcessProtocol is buffered. Docs state:

.outReceived(data): This is called with data that was received from the process' stdout pipe. Pipes tend to provide data in larger chunks than sockets (one kilobyte is a common buffer size), so you may not experience the "random dribs and drabs" behavior typical of network sockets, but regardless you should be prepared to deal if you don't get all your data in a single call. To do it properly, outReceived ought to simply accumulate the data and put off doing anything with it until the process has finished.

The result is, that I get output in one chunk after whole processing is done. How can I force ProcessProtocol not to buffer stdout?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm using external process which writes short line of output for each chunk of data processed. I would like to react after each of these lines without any additional delay.

The result is, that I get output in one chunk after whole processing is done. How can I force ProcessProtocol not to buffer stdout?

The buffering is happening in the producer process, not the consumer. Standard C library stdout is line-buffered only when connected to a terminal, otherwise it is fully-buffered. This is what causes the producer process to output data in large chunks rather than line by line when it is not connected to a terminal.

Use stdbuf utility to force producer process' stdout to be line-buffered.

If the producer process is a python script use -u python interpreter switch to completely turn off buffering of the standard streams. stdbuf utility is better though.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not directly an answer, but sure contains clear pointer to it. As you've said stdout is line-buffered when connected to terminal, thus using spawnProcess with usePTY=True solved this. –  vartec Mar 29 '12 at 15:26
    
I am not familiar with twisted to tell whether usePTY is useful. Standard C library uses isatty() function to detect if it's connected to a terminal. Hence, another option is to LD_PRELOAD a library that super-imposes isatty() to always return 1. –  Maxim Egorushkin Mar 29 '12 at 15:30
2  
I've just checked and usePTY helped, I'm getting my output line by line as I've wanted. Thanx. –  vartec Mar 29 '12 at 15:32
    
usePTY combines stdout with stderr, and I need them separate (one is protocol stream, the other is.. errors.) Be aware of this when you choose this solution, and consider one of the others. If python -u isn't an option, consider os.fdopen(sys.stdout.fileno(), 'w', 0) –  Cory Dec 22 '14 at 21:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.