Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working with a file (fasta file), here is the format-

>chr1
AACCCCCCCCTCCCCCCGCTTCTGGCCACAGCACTTAAACACATCTCTGC
CAAACCCCAAAAACAAAGAACCCTAACACCAGCCTAACCAGATTTCAAAT
TTTATCTTTAGGCGGTATGCACTTTTAACAAAAAANNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
GCCCATCCTACCCAGCACACACACACCGCTGCTAACCCCATACCCCGAAC
CAACCAAACCCCAAAGACACCCCCCACAGTTTATGTAGCTTACCTCNNNN
>chrM
GATCACAGGTCTATCACCCTATTAACCACTCACGGGAGCTCTCCATGCAT
TTGGTATTTTCGTCTGGGGGGTGTGCACGCGATAGCATTGCGAGACGCTG
GAGCCGGAGCACCCTATGTCGCAGTATCTGTCTTTGATTCCTGCCTCATT
CTATTATTTATCGCACCTACGTTCAATATTACAGGCGAACATACCTACTA
AAGTGTGTTAATTAATTAATGCTTGTAGGACATAATAATAACAATTGAAT
GTCTGCACAGCCGCTTTCCACACAGACATCATAACAAAANAATTTCCACC 

I want to use sliding window approach (non overlapping windows, size =50). I want to find the coordinates for each character with in 50bp window but not including N's. The output for first chr1 should be->

chr1   0       50
chr1   50      100
chr1   100     215 
chr1   215     265

The code is -

use warnings; 
*ARGV or die "No input file specified";
open *first, '<',$ARGV[0] or die "Unable to open input file: $!";
$start=1;
while(<first>) {
    chomp;
    if ( /(>)(\w)/ ) {   #taking lines which have name of chromosome
    @arr=split(">");  #splitting at ">" character and in $arr[1], there is chr name now


        if (defined @array){

            foreach (@array){
            $length++;      

                if($_ ne N){
                    $non++;
                    if ($non == 50){

                    print $chr,"\t",$start,"\t",$length,"\n";
                    $start=$length;
                    $non=0;

                    }
                }       
            }
        }

        undef @array;  
        $length=0;
        $non=0;
        $start=0;
    }

    else {

        @count=split(//, $_); #splitting each character in line

        push(@array,@count);  #storing each character in array till we find next chromosome

        $chr=$arr[1];
    } 

}




foreach (@array){
        $length++;

          if($_ ne N){
          $non++;
               if ($non == 50){

        print $chr,"\t",$start,"\t",$length,"\n";
        $start=$length;
        $non=0;

               }
          }

}

The thing is my fasta file is big and this code is taking lot of memory and time. Can you please give suggestions how can I make it fast using less memory.

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
This is not an answer to your question, but it will help clear your script up a bit. If you follow the strict pragma and declare all new variables, such as @array, $length, $non, and $start, with my, they will automatically jump out of scope and you won't have to keep undefing and resetting them. –  Mattrition Mar 29 '12 at 10:48
    
Thanks for your suggestion. I tried with my and use strict in the beginning and when ever I have to print that variable in some other loop, then it shows error (use of uninitialized....). So I skip use strict part. –  Vikas Mar 29 '12 at 10:52
    
what is that foreach at the end actually doing? It looks like it is just duplicated code... –  Mattrition Mar 29 '12 at 10:56
2  
@vikas: if it says you're using an uninitialized variable, don't disable strict, fix your code! The use of strict is made to help you debug; if you disregard this facility, don't come ask for help with broken code when the compiler is telling you it's broken. –  ℝaphink Mar 29 '12 at 12:40
1  
you can use no warnings "uninitialized"; after use strict; use warnings; This means that you get all of the other benefits of s/w without those warnings, which others have complained about too. –  Joel Berger Mar 29 '12 at 13:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Always use strict and use warnings at the start of your program, especially when you are asking for help with it. It will save a lot of time by finding many simple mistakes for you.

From where did you get the idea to use typeglobs in this way? *ARGV is always true so it is useless for testing whether @ARGV is empty, and using *first as a filehandle will work but it is very unusual. Best is the lexical filehandle, like this

open my $first, '<', $ARGV[0] or die $!;

However there is no need to explicitly open the file specified as a parameter: Perl will do this implicitly for you if you read from the null filehandle <>.

This program appears to do what you need.

use strict;
use warnings; 

use constant WINDOW => 50;

@ARGV or die "No input file specified";

my ($key, $pos, $start, $size);

while (<>) {

  if ( /^>(.+?)\s/ ) {
    $key = $1;
    $pos = $size = 0;
    undef $start;
    next;
  }

  chomp;

  for (split //) {
    next unless /[ATGC]/;
    $start //= $pos;
    $size++;
    if ($key and $size == WINDOW) {
      printf "%-6s %4d %4d\n", $key, $start, $pos + 1;
      undef $start;
      $size = 0;
    }
  }
  continue {
    $pos++;
  }
}

output

chr1      0   50
chr1     50  100
chr1    100  215
chr1    215  265
chrM      0   50
chrM     50  100
chrM    100  150
chrM    150  200
chrM    200  250
share|improve this answer
    
Since N (unknown bases) should not be counted for the 50 base pair window, you might have to analyze more than one input row. –  dgw Mar 29 '12 at 12:58
    
@dgw: Thanks - I didn't notice I was out of sync with the required output. But the problem was just that I was displaying the wrong values. I've fixed it. –  Borodin Mar 29 '12 at 13:17
    
Thanks for your help. I am getting an error Search pattern not terminated -> at this line $start //= $pos;. –  Vikas Mar 29 '12 at 13:25
    
@Vikas: you must be on an old version of Perl. The // operator was introduced in Perl v5.10 in 2007. Upgrade, or replace that line with defined $start or $start = $pos; –  Borodin Mar 29 '12 at 13:30
1  
@Vikas: the regular expression is /^>(.+?)\s/ which matches a right angle bracket at the beginning of the string, followed by one or more characters up to the first whitespace character. Ony the one or more characters are within parentheses, and it is this that is captured into $1, having the effect of stripping the angle bracket and any trailing spaces, tabs or linefeeds. –  Borodin Mar 29 '12 at 14:50

Since you need the code to output the data twice I moved it into a subroutine.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict ;
use warnings ;

if( ! @ARGV  ) {
  die "No input file specified";
}

open my $file , '<', $ARGV[0] or die "Unable to open input file: $!";
my ( $chromosome , $start ) = ( undef , 1 ) ;

my @array = () ;
while(<$file>) {
  chomp;

  if ( m/^>(\w+)/ ) { # New chromosome
    my $new_chromosome = $1 ; # Save the new chromosome name temporarily
    if( @array ) {
      split_sequence( $chromosome , \@array ) ;
    }
    @array = () ;
    $chromosome = $new_chromosome ;
  } else {
    push @array , split( // ) ;
  }
}

split_sequence( $chromosome , \@array ) if @array ;

sub split_sequence {
  my ( $chromosome , $arrayref ) = @_ ;

  printf "%-10.10s  %d (total length)\n" , $chromosome , $#{ $arrayref } ;
  my ( $start , $nonN ) = ( 0 , 0 ) ;
  for( my $i = 0 ; $i <= $#{ $arrayref } ; $i++ ) {
    if( $arrayref->[$i] ne 'N' ) {
      $nonN++ ;
      if( $nonN == 50 ) {
        printf "%-10.10s  %8d  %8d\n" , $chromosome , $start , $i ;
        $start = $i + 1 ;
        $nonN = 0 ;
      }
    }
  }
  if( $#{ $arrayref } > $start ) { # Incomplete window leftover ...
                                   # less than 50 bases long
    printf "%-10.10s  %8d  %8d **\n" , $chromosome , $start , $#{ $arrayref } ;
  }
}

Output:

perl SO002.pl SO002.fasta
chr1             299 (total length)
chr1               0        49
chr1              50        99
chr1             100       214
chr1             215       264
chr1             265       299 **
chrM             300 (total length)
chrM               0        49
chrM              50        99
chrM             100       149
chrM             150       199
chrM             200       249
chrM             250       300
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your reply. I will try your code and try to understand it. Then I will come back to you, if I will struggle. –  Vikas Mar 29 '12 at 13:27

Here is a solution that uses the Bio::SeqIO module to parse the fasta file.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Bio::SeqIO;

use constant WINDOW => 50;

my $in  = Bio::SeqIO->new(-file   => "fasta.txt" ,
                          -format => 'Fasta');

while ( my $seq = $in->next_seq() ) {
    my $count = 0;
    my $beg_pos = 0;
    local $_ = $seq->seq;
    while (/(.)/g) {
        ++$count if $1 =~ /[TAGC]/;

        if ($count == WINDOW) {
            $count = 0;
            printf "%s %d %d\n", $seq->id, $beg_pos, pos() - 1;
            $beg_pos = pos();
        }
        elsif (pos == length) { # have read last char in string
            printf "%s %d %d\n", $seq->id, $beg_pos, pos() - 1;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.