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I am trying to make a tool that finds the frequencies of letters in some type of cipher text. Lets suppose it is all lowercase a-z no numbers. The encoded message is in a txt file

I am trying to build a script to help in cracking of substitution or possibly transposition ciphers.

Code so far:

cipher = open('cipher.txt','U').read()
cipherfilter = cipher.lower()
cipherletters = list(cipherfilter)

alpha = list('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz')
occurrences = {} 
for letter in alpha:
    occurrences[letter] = cipherfilter.count(letter)
for letter in occurrences:
    print letter, occurrences[letter]

All it does so far is show how many times a letter appears. How would I print the frequency of all letters found in this file.

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What is the question? Note that you are scanning cipherfilter 26 times! –  Drakosha Jun 14 '09 at 8:11
2  
"All it does so far is show how many times a letter appears.. How would I print the frequency of all letters found in this file." What? Frequency IS how many times a letter appears. If it shows how many times a letter occurs, that's the frequency of each letter. This appears to work. What's your question? –  S.Lott Jun 14 '09 at 10:24

3 Answers 3

import collections

d = collections.defaultdict(int)
for c in 'test':
    d[c] += 1

print d # defaultdict(<type 'int'>, {'s': 1, 'e': 1, 't': 2})

From a file:

myfile = open('test.txt')
for line in myfile:
    line = line.rstrip('\n')
    for c in line:
        d[c] += 1

For the genius that is the defaultdict container, we must give thanks and praise. Otherwise we'd all be doing something silly like this:

s = "andnowforsomethingcompletelydifferent"
d = {}
for letter in s:
    if letter not in d:
        d[letter] = 1
    else:
        d[letter] += 1
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defaultdict... very nice! –  Jake Jun 14 '09 at 8:13

If you want to know the relative frequency of a letter c, you would have to divide number of occurrences of c by the length of the input.

For instance, taking Adam's example:

s = "andnowforsomethingcompletelydifferent"
n = len(s) # n = 37

and storing the absolute frequence of each letter in

dict[letter]

we obtain the relative frequencies by:

from string import ascii_lowercase # this is "a...z"
for c in ascii_lowercase:
    print c, dict[c]/float(n)

putting it all together, we get something like this:

# get input
s = "andnowforsomethingcompletelydifferent"
n = len(s) # n = 37

# get absolute frequencies of letters
import collections
dict = collections.defaultdict(int)
for c in s:
    dict[c] += 1

# print relative frequencies
from string import ascii_lowercase # this is "a...z"
for c in ascii_lowercase:
    print c, dict[c]/float(n)
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2  
You shouldn't use dict as a variable name. –  Jason Sundram Nov 29 '11 at 20:36

The modern way:

from collections import Counter

string = "ihavesometextbutidontmindsharing"
Counter(string)
#>>> Counter({'i': 4, 't': 4, 'e': 3, 'n': 3, 's': 2, 'h': 2, 'm': 2, 'o': 2, 'a': 2, 'd': 2, 'x': 1, 'r': 1, 'u': 1, 'b': 1, 'v': 1, 'g': 1})
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