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When I'm writing a function in a template class how can I find out what my T is?

e.g.

template <typename T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out,Vector<T>& vec)
{
if (typename T == int)
}

How can I write the above if statement so it works?

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Just so you know, there's pretty much a consensus that you've accepted the wrong answer. Might want to unaccept it and pick another one. :) –  jalf Jun 14 '09 at 15:49
    
Thanks for all your input! Initially I accepted the typeid answer because specialization seemed like overkill for the simple function I was writing, but later on I ended up making the function a bit more complicated so I opted for specialization anyway. –  Dave Jun 15 '09 at 6:33

8 Answers 8

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Something like this:

template< class T >
struct TypeIsInt
{
    static const bool value = false;
};

template<>
struct TypeIsInt< int >
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <typename T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out,Vector<T>& vec)
{
    if (TypeIsInt< T >::value)
    // ...
}
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Define it explicitly, e.g.:

template <>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out,Vector<int>& vec)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Remove template <int> and it'll be fine. –  avakar Jun 14 '09 at 9:04
    
thanks, for pointing on mistake, I didn't touched C++ for a while, I didn't remember how to write specialization for templates. –  Artem Barger Jun 14 '09 at 9:08
6  
No need for a template specialization. Prefer an overload over Function template specializations. The latter can be surprising sometimes. (There's a GOTW on the subject) –  jalf Jun 14 '09 at 11:02
    
+1 Template specialization is the way to do it. –  ralphtheninja Jun 14 '09 at 11:49

Simplest, most general solution: Just write a plain old overload of the function:

ostream& operator << (ostream &out,Vector<int>& vec)
{
// Your int-specific implementation goes here
}

This assumes that the int and non-int versions don't have much code in common, as you have to write two separate implementations.

IF you want to use one common implementation of the function, with just an if statement inside that differs, use Charles Bailey's implementation:

template< class T >
struct TypeIsInt
{
    static const bool value = false;
};

template<>
struct TypeIsInt< int >
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <typename T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out,Vector<T>& vec)
{
    if (TypeIsInt< T >::value) {
      // your int-specific code here
    }
}

In general, don't use typeid if you don't need to.

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The easiest way is to provide a template specialisation:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template <typename T> struct A {
};

template <typename T > 
ostream & operator <<( ostream & os, A<T> & a  ) {
    return os << "not an int" << endl;
}


template <> 
ostream & operator <<( ostream & os, A<int> & a  ) {
    return os << "an int" << endl;
}

int main() {
    A <double> ad;
    cout << ad;
    A <int> ai;
    cout << ai;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You have a semicolon after the second function template definition. Also, why do you prefer template specialization to an overload? –  avakar Jun 14 '09 at 9:13
    
Weird - that exact code compiled with g++ with no errors! –  anon Jun 14 '09 at 9:17
4  
<Exceptional C++ Style> If you're writing a primary function template that is likely to need specialization, prefer to write it as a single function template that should never be specialized or overloaded, and then implement the function template entirely as a simple handoff to a class template containing a static function with the same signature. Everyone can specialize that both fully and partially, and without affecting the results of overload resolution. –  TimW Jun 14 '09 at 9:17
    
+1 Here as well. –  ralphtheninja Jun 14 '09 at 11:49
1  
@avakar, they are only optional after member function definitions (within class), but not as a normal function definition (likewise, they aren't legal after template declarations, regardless of whether they appear in class or not). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 14 '09 at 14:32

This way.

ostream & operator << (ostream &out, Vector<int> const & vec)
{
    // ...
}

The compiler will choose this function over the function template if you pass Vector<int>.

Edit: I found this article, which attempts to explain why to prefer overloading to template specialization.

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+1 because its a great article but if you read "Moral #2" you should have made it a class template specialization. I can't believe all the others just ignore this article or didn't read "Exceptional C++ Style" –  TimW Jun 14 '09 at 12:17
    
+1: Always prefer overloading over specialization. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 14 '09 at 14:22

TypeID is never a good idea. It relies on RTTI. By the way here is your answer :http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/templates.html#faq-35.7

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So RTTI is bad now? And typeid is known at compile-time. –  GManNickG Jun 14 '09 at 9:13
    
what's the problem with RTTI? –  Dave Jun 14 '09 at 9:23
    
typeid is quite slow. Template specialization is done at the compile time while typeid costs you runtime. Make your way. Ref:velocityreviews.com/forums/… –  siddhant3s Jun 14 '09 at 9:40
    
How can something computed compile-time be slow? typeof(T) is known at compile time, as is typeof(int), and so on. Therefore, it will reduce to if (true), else if (false), etc... then the dead code will be removed, as will the if (true) check. –  GManNickG Jun 14 '09 at 10:43
3  
@siddhant3s: funny that you say consult the standard, but actually refer to MSDN, which is the documentation of your-favourite-compiler. It says, "If the expression is neither a pointer nor a reference to a base class of the object, the result is a type_info reference representing the static type of the expression. " –  Steve Jessop Jun 14 '09 at 13:48

C++ templates don't work this way. The general idea of templates is express somethings which is common for a lot of different types. And in your case you should use template specialization.

template<class T> ostream& operator<< (ostream& out, const vector<T>& v)
{
    // your general code for all type
}
// specialized template
template<> ostream& operator<< <int>(ostream& out, const vector<int>& vec)
{
    // your specific to iny type code goes here
}

Then C++ compiler will call this function when you use int type and general implementation for any other type

std::vector<int> f(5, 5);
std::cout << f;
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Since C++11 we have std::is_same:

if (std::is_same<T, int>::value) ...

It's implemented similar to the suggested trait TypeIsInt suggested in the other answers, but with two types to be compared.

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