Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm getting all in a twist trying to get this to work. New to scala and to actors so may inadvertently be making bad design decisions - please tell me if so.

The setup is this:

I have a controlling actor which contains a number of worker actors. Each worker represents a calculation that for a given input will spit out 1..n outputs. The controller has to set off each worker, collect the returned outputs, then carry on and do a bunch more stuff once this is complete. This is how I approached it using receive in the controller actor:

class WorkerActor extends Actor {
  def act() {
    loop {
      react {
        case DoJob =>
          for (1 to n) sender ! Result
          sender ! Done
      }
    }
  }
}

The worker actor is simple enough - it spits out results until it's done, when it sends back a Done message.

class ControllerActor(val workers: List[WorkerActor]) extends Actor {
  def act() {
     workers.foreach(w => w ! DoJob)
     receiveResults(workers.size)

     //do a bunch of other stuff
  }

  def receiveResults(count: Int) {
    if (count == 0) return

    receive {
      case Result => 
        // do something with this result (that updates own mutable state)
        receiveResults(count)
      case Done 
        receiveResults(count - 1)
    }
  }
}

The controller actor kicks off each of the workers, then recursively calls receive until it has received a Done message for each of the workers.

This works, but I need to create lots of the controller actors, so receive is too heavyweight - I need to replace it with react.

However, when I use react, the behind-the-scenes exception kicks in once the final Done message is processed, and the controller actor's act method is short-circuited, so none of the "//do a bunch of other stuff" that comes after happens.

I can make something happen after the final Done message by using andThen { } - but I actually need to do several sets of calculations in this manner so would end up with a ridiculously nested structure of andThen { andThen { andThen } }s.

I also want to hide away this complexity in a method, which would then be moved into a separate trait, such that a controller actor with a number of lists of worker actors can just be something like this:

class ControllerActor extends Actor with CalculatingTrait { 
//CalculatingTrait has performCalculations method

    val listOne: List[WorkerActor]
    val ListTwo: List[WorkerActor]   
    def act {
      performCalculations(listOne)
      performCalculations(listTwo)
    }
}

So is there any way to stop the short-circuiting of the act method in the performCalculations method? Is there a better design approach I could be taking?

share|improve this question
    
I've had much better luck with Akka's actors than Scala's built-in actors. Have you tried implementing with that? At the very least it gets you away from the receive/react nonsense. –  dave Mar 29 '12 at 19:25
    
Yes, I think I need to have a look at Akka, thanks. –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 19:28
add comment

3 Answers

Here's how I might approach it (in way that seems to be more comments and boilerplate than actual content):

class WorkerController(val workerCriteria: List[WorkerCriteria]) {

  // The actors that only _I_ interact with are probably no one else's business
  // Your call, though
  val workers = generateWorkers(workerCriteria)

  // No need for an `act` method--no need for this to even be an actor

  /* Will send `DoJob` to each actor, expecting a reply from each.
   * Could also use the `!!` operator (instead of `!?`) if you wanted
   * them to return futures (so WorkerController could continue doing other
   * things while the results compute).  The futures could then be evaluated
   * with `results map (_())`, which will _then_ halt execution to wait for each
   * future that isn't already computed (if any).
   */
  val results = workers map (_ !? DoJob)
  //do a bunch of other stuff with your results

  def generateWorkers(criteria: List[WorkerCriteria]) = // Create some workers!

}

class Worker extends Actor {
  def act() {
    loop {
      react {
        case DoJob =>
          // Will generate a result and send it back to the caller
          reply(generateResult)
      }
    }
  }
  def generateResult = // Result?
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer. Unfortunately the crux of the problem is that the workers emit multiple results for each job, so this wouldn't work. Also, wouldn't workers map (_ !? DoJob) defeat the point of using actors? The map implementation isn't multithreaded is it? –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 18:13
    
@Russell Well... like I said, you could use !! to get futures, which wouldn't block the thread; the message would just get sent to the actor and forgotten about by the sender until it's ready to evaluate the future. Looking back at it, !! is actually the only reasonable option for what you use there. My bad. –  Destin Mar 29 '12 at 18:20
    
@Russell On the topic of workers emitting multiple results, that strikes me as a very bizarre design. What are the circumstances that are causing your workers to need to emit multiple results? If the workers are just created doing a sequence of unrelated computations, why not return a list or wrapper class around those results? If they're doing compounded calculations, maybe each actor should spawn another actor, such that each actor does only one set of calculations on the given data? (Controller sends A; Actor1 does A => B; Actor2 does B => C, etc.) –  Destin Mar 29 '12 at 18:24
    
Well, an example of workers emitting multiple results in this way would be the map part of the map/reduce implementation in MongoDB. (That's not written in Scala though.) I'm open to other design ideas. The wrapper class I think would lose you a good chunk of concurrency as the controller won't be able to do anything with any of the results for a particular worker until all of them are ready. I'm not quite sure what you mean with your second example, care to expand on it a little? –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 18:40
    
Thanks again for your answer, it gave me just the nudge in the right direction I needed! –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 19:19
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: Have just been reading about Akka actors and spotted that they "guarantee message order on a per sender basis". So I updated my example such that, if the controller needed to later ask the receiver for the computed value and needed to be sure it was all complete, it could do so with a message order guarantee on only a per sender basis (the example is still scala actors, not akka).

It finally hit me, with a bit of help from @Destin's answer, that I could make it a lot simpler by separating out the part of the controller responsible for kicking off the workers from the part responsible for accepting and using the results. Single responsibility principle I suppose... Here's what I did (separating out the original controlling actor into a controlling class and a 'receiver' actor):

case class DoJob(receiever: Actor)
case object Result
case object JobComplete
case object Acknowledged
case object Done

class Worker extends Actor {
  def act {
    loop {
      react {
        case DoJob(receiver) => 
          receiver ! Result
          receiver ! Result
          receiver !? JobComplete match {
            case Acknowledged =>
              sender ! Done
          }
      }
    }
  }
}

class Receiver extends Actor {
  def act {
    loop {
      react {
        case Result => println("Got result!")
        case JobComplete => sender ! Acknowledged
      }
    }
  }
}

class Controller {
  val receiver = new Receiver
  val workers = List(new Worker, new Worker, new Worker)

  receiver.start()
  workers.foreach(_.start())

  workers.map(_ !! DoJob(receiver)).map(_())

  println("All the jobs have been done")
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I was writing you a big, elaborate response about some possibilities (one of which was like this, but much more complicated), but if this is all you needed, awesome! –  Destin Mar 29 '12 at 19:44
    
Thanks again @Destin! –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 19:46
    
I would be interested in seeing your other approaches if you haven't discarded them? –  Russell Mar 29 '12 at 19:47
    
Yeah... I threw them out when I saw that you were pleased with what you have here. As an overview, one was basically mergesort-like; everytime your worker accumulated a lot of data (say... 10 items), it would forward that data off to another worker, which would reply with a processed list. Then that parent worker would merge the results of its child workers as they came in, and, when all of the results had been merged/processed together, it would send them back to its parent, propagating up until the data was back in the controller's hands. That only makes sense in a very niche case, though. –  Destin Mar 29 '12 at 19:54
    
The other was like this, but... it was complicated. The controller formed a list of functions (let's say that there were three), and then created a WorkerManager (and there are going to be three WorkerManagers total, to correspond to the three functions). The WorkerManager is given the head of the list as its function, and the tail to read. If the tail isn't Nil, the WorkerManager creates another WorkerManager and assigns the head of the tail to it. All workers created by the first manager will forward their results to the to second manager, who will make more workers, –  Destin Mar 29 '12 at 19:59
show 2 more comments

You can avoid react/receive entirely by using Akka actor's. Here's what you implementation could look like:

import akka.actor._

class WorkerActor extends Actor {
  def receive = {
    case DoJob =>
      for (_ <- 1 to n) sender ! Result
      sender ! Done
  }
}

class ControllerActor(workers: List[ActorRef]) extends Actor {
  private[this] var countdown = workers.size

  override def preStart() {
    workers.foreach(_ ! DoJob)
  }

  def receive = {
    case Result =>
      // do something with this result
    case Done =>
      countdown -= 1
      if (countdown == 0) {
        // do a bunch of other stuff

        // It looks like your controllers die when the workers
        // are done, so I'll do the same.
        self ! PoisonPill
      }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it looks like Akka actors are the way to go. –  Russell Apr 2 '12 at 17:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.