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Scenario: a game with a board, and several tiles on it. Classes: Board, Tile, Player and of course, Game. Whenever the player presses a tile, his score gets incremented by 1. Board is instantiated inside of Game, and an array of Tile is instantiated inside of Board. My first option to increment that score easily was to make a public static class with a public static field (Score). Of course, it's rather amateurish. And seemed to break the overall flow of the app.

After some thought, I changed everything to use Events; Tile raises an event when clicked; Board handles that event, and raises another event to the main Game class. Player is instantiated inside of Game; when Game handles the event received from Board, it does a PlayerOne(instance of Player).Score += 1;

Should I just go on ahead and use this flow? Do you have any other architecture/design ideas that would work better? Why would your ideas work better? I didn't use custom made events intensively before and I feel that the whole event raising another even idea might be a bit wrong. From afar though, it looks like a good flow. And it certainly does the job correctly.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should have provided some code.

Should I just go on ahead and use this flow?

Depends on what the events look like.

Do you have any other architecture/design ideas that would work better?

Publish/Subscribe is an alternative. But the .NET events works fine here.

I didn't use custom made events intensively before and I feel that the whole event raising another even idea might be a bit wrong.

It's fine to keep encapsulation. I would do something like:

class Tile
{
    public event EventHandler Clicked = delegate{};
}

class Board
{
    private void OnTileClick(object source, EventArgs e)
    {
        var tile = (Tile)source;
        //doSome

        var args = new CustomEventArgs();
        CustomEvent(this, args);
    }

    public event EventHandler<CustomEventArgs> SomeEvent = delegate{};
}

public class SomeCustomEventArgs : EventArgs
{
}
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Indeed, should have posted some code; still, your code did help: makes much more sense to call the tile's animation from the board, as the board "manages" the tiles. Before, I would first start the animation via the tile's class, and then I would raise the TilePress event to the Board. –  Alex M. Mar 29 '12 at 14:55
    
Got some great answers here; especially those about the observer pattern (now I know what to call my experiment). Unfortunately, I can only choose one. I think I'll choose yours since the code helped too. –  Alex M. Mar 29 '12 at 14:56

The only other possiblity that springs to mind is passing / setting in delegates from higher classes that act as callbacks - so the lower classes can check for a valid delegate and call it without any knowledge of who owns it. If you make it a list of possible delegates, it allow for multiple subscribers all benefitting from that callback.

Having said that, I find your event architecture pretty elegant.

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What you described looks like (is) the observer design pattern. The game should 'listen' to events from the board, the board should listen to events from the tiles etc.

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Another way to look at it is that the Board depends on Player to function correctly. How many players are there at any one time and do players get added to and from the board during game time?

If not, you might be able to pass the player(s) to the board on creation and then the board could increment the player score. This works as long as there is no other logic that happens at the Game level which could influence the scoring.

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The architecture you seem to have implemented works well for this scenario.

using the observer architecture allows the dependencies you have created through the object relationships to be easily managed.

The observer architecture here will allow you you add or remove players, tiles, boards very easily. If there was a requirement for a 'Game' to now manage multiple boards, then simply adding the object in and subscribing to its exposed events allows you to manage that elegantly. This is because a tile does not need to know that a player exists. The same way a player does not need to know that a game exists - they just do their jobs independently.

Other patterns may create unwanted dependencies, leading to the extra code that would be required to pass the information back up the chain (from tile, to player, to game) - that could very easily result in issues further down the line of your project implementation.

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