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I am writing a somewhat complex game engine in Android.

Currently I have a thread used to update subsystems.

Inside the update method is the method to update game logic, which is based on current game state.

The game state has a scene, which is updated. Scenes are composed of a root node, which makes a simple scene graph structure.

Roots are nodes which have children that are also updated and so on and so forth.

Anyway, this is all nice and dandy and works great, until I get a million of these in my Logcat: 03-29 09:23:22.866: D/dalvikvm(18554): GC_CONCURRENT freed 511K, 52% free 2773K/5767K, external 77K/587K, paused 2ms+3ms

I've isolated the cause of the leak to be the update loop, as when I comment out my method to update subsystems, there is no GC messages. Further more, I've commented deep into the update loop, and up to the point where the root node's children update is the point when the GC would run frantically.

(GameLgoic)
public void onUpdate(float deltaTime) 
    {
        if (gameState != null)
            gameState.onUpdate(deltaTime);
    }
(GameState)
public void onUpdate(float deltaTime) 
    {
        scene.onUpdate(deltaTime);
    }
(Scene) 
public void onUpdate(float deltaTime)
    {
        root.onUpdate(deltaTime);
    }
(SceneNode)
public void onUpdate(float deltaTime)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < children.size(); ++i)
        {
            children.get(i).onUpdate(deltaTime); // Memory leak runs crazily here
        }
    }

If I comment out children.get(i).onUpdate(deltaTime) There is no leaks! My mind is so boggled. Thanks guys.

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1  
Good news: Your leak is not the onUpdate() call. It is the code that is inside that method. Please add the relevant code snippets. –  WarrenFaith Mar 29 '12 at 13:36
1  
Please show the definition of children and the associated onUpdate method. –  Gray Mar 29 '12 at 13:38
2  
Oh and every time you call size() in a loop, a kitten dies. You should check the performance guide in the official documentation :) –  WarrenFaith Mar 29 '12 at 13:41
    
The onUpdate method for children (arrayList) is the same for the root, just updating any children they have (currently the tree isn't too big), but in the future sceneNodes will handle updating mesh animations, etc. I'm going to probably just refractor that to an updateChildren method. But ill check out your suggestions after class –  DubyaDubyaDubyaDot Mar 29 '12 at 14:14
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I ran into similar problem when I made a game for Android. The only way to get out of this is to code embedded-C-Style. So if you want a loop, reuse your counting variable, as well as your bounding variable, whenever possible, like so:

int i;
int max
void loop(){
    max = bla.size();
    for(i=0; i<max; i++){ ... }
}

The same goes for literally everything else you touch. So you might consider to keep references to objects you don't need anymore and to recycle them later.

It is insane what difference it made to my game implementing those changes. Framerate doubled, vast reduction of lags and so on.

You should look into the DDMS tool, which is delieverd which the eclipse Android SDK. You can use it to track down allocations, to avoid those problems.

Addtionally, you should consider removing all interators, since they are allocated everytime you jump into a loop and cannot be recycled. So it is better to loop manually and to walk through your lists multiple times (get(x) in loop) than having to wait for the garbage collector in the long run.

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good improvement, but as he mentioned If I comment out children.get(i).onUpdate(deltaTime) There is no leaks! the cause seems to be in the code of that method, not the loop itself... –  WarrenFaith Mar 29 '12 at 13:52
    
in this case the for(Child c : children) syntax might also be handy. –  Jave Mar 29 '12 at 13:56
    
I just extended my answer to cover that as well: iterators will also be objects to be collected by the GC, so that's no option, unfortunately. –  devsnd Mar 29 '12 at 13:59
    
This seems like what I should be doing. Ill check it out after class –  DubyaDubyaDubyaDot Mar 29 '12 at 14:15
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First to clarify terminology - you don't have a memory leak. A memory leak occurs when the memory usage of your app grows and grows because it is not releasing the memory its no longer using. You have the opposite problem - you're releasing a lot of unused memory which has to be garbage collected.

Freeing unused memory is normally a good thing; it only becomes a problem when the Garbage Collection required to clean up the released memory causes performance problems which is what you're seeing here.

There is nothing major wrong with the code you've posted so far. The problem it seems lies inside the onUpdate() method so you could post the code for that.

In general you can cut down on garbage collections by reusing objects where possible rather than destroying and creating them.

Finally, a minor point, you can replace:

for (int i = 0; i < children.size(); ++i)
{
    children.get(i).onUpdate(deltaTime); // Memory leak runs crazily here
}

with a for loop:

for (SomeClass child : children) {
    child.onUpdate(deltaTime);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ill give it a shot in a bit! Thanks mate. –  DubyaDubyaDubyaDot Mar 29 '12 at 14:16
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