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I need to find out the Epoch time from a binary data file which has following data structure (it is a 12 byte structure):

Field-1 : Byte 1, Byte 2, + 6 Bits from Byte 3
Time-1  :                   2 Bits from Byte 3 + Byte 4
Time-2  : Byte 5, Byte 6, Byte 7, Byte 8
Field-2 : Byte 9, Byte 10, Byte 11, Byte 12

For Field-1 and Field-2 I do not have issue as they can be taken out easily.

I need time value in Epoch Time (long) as it has been packed in Bytes 5,6,7,8 and 3 and 4 as follows:

  • Bytes 5 to 8 (32 bit word) Packs time value bits from 0 thru 31 (byte 5 has 0 to 7 bits, byte 6 has 8 to 15, byte 7 has 16 to 23, byte 8 has 24 to 31).

The remaining 10 bits of time value are packed in Bytes 3 and byte 4 as follows:

  • byte 3 has 2 bits:32 and 33, and Byte 4 has remaining bits : 34 to 41.

So total bits for time value is 42 bits, packed as above.

I need to compute epoch value coming out of these 42 bits. How do I do it?

I have done something like this but not sure it gives me correct value:

typedef struct P_HEADER {
    unsigned int tmuNumber : 22; //sorry for the typo.
    unsigned int time1 : 10; // Bits 6,7 from Byte-3 + 8 bits from Byte-4
    unsigned int time2 : 32; // 32 bits: Bytes 5,6,7,8
    unsigned int traceKey : 32; 
} __attribute__((__packed__)) P_HEADER;

Then in the code:

P_HEADER *header1;

//get input string in hexa,etc..etc..
//parse the input with the header as :
header1 = (P_HEADER *)inputBuf;
// then print the header1->time1, header1->time2 ....
long ttime = header1->time1|header1->time2;

Is this the way to get values out?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Mar 29 '12 at 14:26

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
Why 21 and not 22 bits? What does packed do when you've got 31 bits in the first two bit fields? Are the remaining two 32-bit fields oddly aligned? – Jonathan Leffler Mar 29 '12 at 14:30
    
Is your local time_t a 32-bit or 64-bit quantity? What does your 42-bit time value contain when the represented time is 1970-01-01 00:00:00+00:00? What value does it contain for 2012-03-29 07:33:55-08:00? For Unix systems, the answers are 0 and 1333031635 respectively. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 29 '12 at 14:34
    
First, I think the tmuNumber is 22 bits (8+8+6), second, the ttime you want will be time1 followed by ttime2 bits, isn't it? Then I think you need to do the following: uint64_t ttime = (((uint64_t)header1->time1) << 32) + ((uint64_t)header1->time2); – rbelli Mar 29 '12 at 14:38
    
i think that's a miscount, he clearly describes that the first bit of padding is 22 bits long. However, if I understand the specs correctly, time1 needs a shift first before `|'ing – hroptatyr Mar 29 '12 at 14:38

This will give you the value as you descibe it:

typedef struct P_HEADER {
    unsigned int tmuNumber : 22;
    unsigned int time1 : 10; // Bits 6,7 from Byte-3 + 8 bits from Byte-4
    unsigned int time2 : 32; // 32 bits: Bytes 5,6,7,8
    unsigned int traceKey : 32; 
} __attribute__((__packed__)) P_HEADER;

long ttime = ((uint64_t)header1->time1) << 32 | header1->time2;

Works only like that on little-endian machines though.

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