Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below is one of my C functiosn:

void test(char * ptr)
{
    ptr[0] = 'T';
    ptr[1] = 'O';
    ptr[2] = 'P';
    ptr[3] = '\0';
}

Is there a way to shorten this? I've tried

void test(char * ptr)
{
    ptr[0] = "TOP";
}

but that doesn't work. [Note: I do not have the library function strcpy() or similar.]

share|improve this question
1  
If you don't have a strcpy, you may want to write one. It's pretty much a one liner. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 29 '12 at 14:55
    
*((int*)ptr) = 'T' << 24 | 'O' << 16 | 'P' << 8; –  Yossarian Mar 29 '12 at 14:57
    
ptr = "TOP"; doesn't do it? –  Roy Dictus Mar 29 '12 at 14:58
1  
@Yossarian That only works on a big endian machine, on an little endian machine memory would be '\0', 'P', 'O', 'T'. –  Fred Mar 29 '12 at 15:08
2  
@Yossarian, @Fred: in addition to endianness issues, it breaks on platforms which are less forgiving of unaligned access; it's actually UB - if the ptr argument doesn't point to an int, the assignment will violate effective typing (aka strict aliasing) –  Christoph Mar 29 '12 at 15:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, you need to write your own strcpy(). You can only do char ptr[] = "TOP" for initializers.

But you can do this which can easily be changed to strcpy():

void test(char * ptr)
{
    char * S_TOP = "TOP";

    do {
        *ptr++ = *S_TOP++;
    } while( *S_TOP != '\0' );
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming GCC, take a look at the list of built-in functions. In particular, both __builtin_strcpy() and __builtin_memcpy() are available as compiler instrinsics and need no library support.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.