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I'm building a running light library on top of raphaeljs. In the code example below I'm trying to iterate through the set of circles in blocks of 5 and animate the blocks individually.

What I don't understand is why x has a value of 1 in the first alert and becomes a value of 2 after passing it to the fade function. Any ideas why? I must be overlooking something by can not figure it out... Thanks!

Raphael(function() {

    var r = Raphael("Test"),

    run = document.getElementById("run"), set = r.set(r.circle(62, 100, 6),
            r.circle(125, 100, 3), r.circle(139, 100, 3),
            r.circle(153, 100, 3), r.circle(167, 100, 3),
            r.circle(181, 100, 3), r.circle(195, 100, 3),
            r.circle(209, 100, 3), r.circle(223, 100, 3),
            r.circle(237, 100, 3), r.circle(251, 100, 3),
            r.circle(265, 100, 3), r.circle(279, 100, 3),
            r.circle(293, 100, 3), r.circle(307, 100, 3),
            r.circle(321, 100, 3), r.circle(334, 100, 3),
            r.circle(348, 100, 3), r.circle(362, 100, 3),
            r.circle(376, 100, 3), r.circle(390, 100, 3)).attr({
        stroke : "none",
        fill : "#e6e6e6"
    }),

    fade = function(obj, id, x) {
        alert('passed x = ' + x);
        return function() {

            obj[(5 * x) - id].attr({
                fill : "#49719b",
                r : 4
            }).animate({
                fill : "#e6e6e6",
                r : 3
            }, 400);
        };
    };

    run.onclick = function() {

        var i = 0;

        while (i <= 0) {

            for (x = 1; x <= 1; x++) {

                alert('initial x = ' + x);

                setTimeout(function() {
                    set[0].animate({
                        "20%" : {
                            callback : fade(set, 0, x)
                        },
                        "40%" : {
                            callback : fade(set, 1, x)
                        },
                        "60%" : {
                            callback : fade(set, 2, x)
                        },
                        "80%" : {
                            callback : fade(set, 3, x)
                        },
                        "100%" : {
                            callback : fade(set, 4, x)
                        }
                    }, 650);
                }, i * 650);
            }
            i++;
        }
    };
});
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Javascript doesn't have block scope for variables... You have to use a closure :

for (x = 1; x <= 1; x++) {
    (function (x) {
        alert('initial x = ' + x);

        setTimeout(function () {
            set[0].animate({
                "20%": {
                    callback: fade(set, 0, x)
                },
                "40%": {
                    callback: fade(set, 1, x)
                },
                "60%": {
                    callback: fade(set, 2, x)
                },
                "80%": {
                    callback: fade(set, 3, x)
                },
                "100%": {
                    callback: fade(set, 4, x)
                }
            }, 650);
        }, i * 650);
    })(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great thank you, it's working now. But I don't really understand what's going on here. You enclose the setTimeout call in a function to ensure x keeps it value over time? What does the syntax do with function (x) {...}(x) – Karel Mellen Apr 2 '12 at 8:47
    
This syntax let you call an anonymous function immediately after its definition. And I pass x as a parameter to this function. – Romain Meresse Apr 2 '12 at 10:15

Your fade function is called after the for loop has already exited (at the end of each animation step). The value of x then will be 2, because that's when the loop should exit (when x is not <= 1, and the first time that happens is when x reaches 2).

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