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I've got a test site here with two columns, both with absolute positioning.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/17844821/zeug/heighttest.html

As you can see, the left column has more content than the right one, so that will cause scroll bars. Since I want the right column to get the same height as the left one, I gave it height: 100% css property.

Now scroll down and you'll see what happens. The right column expands to 100% of the browser window's height and not 100% height of the whole website.

How can I give both divs 100% full height? (Already tried bottom: 0; for the right div. Won't work.)

Note: .wrapper must stay with position: absolute as it is an requirement for my original whole website layout.

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You should use floats instead of absolute positioning. –  Diodeus Mar 29 '12 at 15:06
    
@Diodeus Ok, so here is a floated version. dl.dropbox.com/u/17844821/zeug/heighttest2.html - Still has the same issue. –  Timo Mar 29 '12 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use only this:

body { overflow:auto; margin:0; }
.wrapper { display:table; width:100%; }
.left, .right { display:table-cell; width:50%; }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jan, that looks like a really elegant solution but what if I need .wrapper to be positioned absolutely? When my web app starts, I use top:-100% to hide it. Then after clicking a link, I use jQuery to set top:0 to slide it in via an animation transition. –  Timo Mar 29 '12 at 17:05
1  
Use opacity to hide elements, it is better. If you really need absolute, just do it in jQuery $('.left,.right').height(Math.max($('.left).height(),$('.right').height(),$(wind‌​ow).height())); –  Jan Šafránek Mar 29 '12 at 19:05

You don't really need "wrapper", but if you leave it in, you need to make it 100% height as well.

html, body{
    height: 100%;
}

body{
    overflow: hidden;
}

.red{
    background: red;
}

.blue{
    background: blue;
}

.wrapper{
height:100%
}

.left{
    float: left;
    width: 50%;
    height:100%;
}

.right{
    float: right;
    height: 100%;
    width: 50%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried. Didn't work. –  Timo Mar 29 '12 at 17:11

You can achieve this using tables. Though I realize some people despise tables for anything other than data representation.

See dabblet for example: http://dabblet.com/gist/2238394

CSS

.red{
    background: red;
}

.blue{
    background: blue;
}

.wrapper{
    overflow: auto;
    width:100%;
}
td{
    vertical-align:top;
}

HTML

<table class="wrapper">
    <tr>
        <td class="red">
            foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo
        </td>
        <td class="blue">
            foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo<br>bar<br>foo<br>foo
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter care to comment? –  Khan Mar 29 '12 at 15:23
    
I didn't vote down but I would agree that using tables isn't a good idea for creating a website layout because of the lack of semantics ("A table is a table is a table is a table"). Using div's with display:table and display:table-cell should probably be the way to achieve the same looking result although I am still testing my layout with these css attributes. –  Timo Mar 29 '12 at 17:01
    
Right, hence the comment I made in my answer. But I still don't see why this deserved a downvote. –  Khan Mar 29 '12 at 17:04
    
I guess that's because table layouts are usually considered as "bad practice". It's an relict from html 3.2 web design. From what I've read so far in html books and online tutorials, one should always avoid table layouts which could be the reason why the downvoter didn't consider your suggestion as a good practice. However, as I already said, I didn't vote down, so this is just a guess. –  Timo Mar 29 '12 at 17:11

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