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For example, in JavaScript, !important means 'not important'. In CSS, it means 'this is important'.

Are there languages other than CSS where an exclamation mark is used for affirmation rather than negation? Why was the '!' chosen in CSS?

EDIT

I don't know if it's a coincidence, but ! is the earliest non-system and non-whitespace character in the ASCII table (at #32). In terms of parsing, would that make it quicker?

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Are there languages other than CSS where an exclamation mark is used for affirmation rather than negation? -- How about natural languages? ;) –  delnan Mar 29 '12 at 15:29
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the obvious candidate for another language using ! for affirmation is natural language! –  MD-Tech Mar 29 '12 at 15:30
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Why do JavaScript style comments (//) not work in CSS? You could create a whole wiki entry of stuff like this. –  j08691 Mar 29 '12 at 15:31
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It's notable that a lot of languages don't use ! for "not" because it's confusing. For example, Python's not operator is not. –  Brendan Long Mar 29 '12 at 15:32
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Why does CSS not have an equivalent of malloc? –  Marcin Mar 29 '12 at 15:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

! is more of an escape character than it is an operator. It is part of important, rather than a separate piece (e.g. in JavaScript I'd see this as ! and somevar, whereas in CSS I see this as !important). So, it isn't so much affirmation as you put it; it just so happens to be the character they chose to throw in front of the keyword important.

Also, in non-programming languages, ! is often used to draw attention to something, although it is often accompanied by some other sort of shape/symbol as well (e.g. ⚠), and this is likely the reason why ! was chosen. It may be helpful to see it as important! or ¡important! (!important is just easier to parse and type than the alternatives).

Edit: As noted by @mike-samuel: "The lexical scanner section of the CSS2.1 grammar spec lists !important as a single token ("!"({w}|{comment})*{I}{M}{P}{O}{R}{T}{A}{N}{T} {return IMPORTANT_SYM;}) although it does allow whitespace and comments between the ! and important."

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Quite right. The lexical grammar lists !important as a single token ("!"({w}|{comment})*{I}{M}{P}{O}{R}{T}{A}{N}{T} {return IMPORTANT_SYM;}) although it does allow whitespace and comments between the '!' and the 'i'. –  Mike Samuel Mar 29 '12 at 15:33
    
That does sound like a good explanation. Can any parsing experts confirm that !important is easier to parse than important!? –  Blowski Mar 29 '12 at 15:46
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@Blowski, If you had ! at the end, you'd have to look ahead for the ! so you can distinguish important the identifier from important!. Comment&space tokens can be arbitrarily long so you have to be prepared to consume an arbitrary number of characters after the special identifier important but this isn't really a problem in hand-rolled parsers because comments are ignored. For Yacc, important! would be a non-lexical production. This is a minor inconvenience. –  Mike Samuel Mar 29 '12 at 16:00
    
@MikeSamuel Thanks, that clears that up. Different question - |important would be no more expensive than !important, even though | is at the end of the ASCII table? Is that right? –  Blowski Mar 29 '12 at 16:28
    
@Blowski, if you look at the SpiderMonkey source code file jsscan.cpp you'll see a table static const uint8 firstCharKinds[] which is fast lookup table that lets the lexer classify tokens by first byte. A very small hand-rolled scanner that used this technique might have to have a larger table if you use | but I doubt it would affect anything in practice. Memory constrained devices don't parse CSS. –  Mike Samuel Mar 29 '12 at 16:46

! is an exclamation mark, so in itself it states that something is important. So I'd rather say it's odd that (other) programming languages use ! as a negator.

In HTML ! is part of a comment <!-- -->, so it has another meaning there.

But then again, CSS is not a programming language at all..

And even amongst programming languages there are differences. And that makes sense., if they were all the same, it would be only one language. :D

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On the other hand, CSS does have C-like structures, like the { and } to delimit blocks, ; to end a style, etc. AND it does have a NOT operator! So the OP's question does make sense. –  Mr Lister Mar 29 '12 at 15:35
    
++1: Completely agree, especially about the fact it's not a programming language. –  Neil Knight Mar 29 '12 at 15:39
    
@MrLister, hmm, I should have drank more caffeine this morning. Apologies on that--deleting comment. –  bfrohs Mar 29 '12 at 15:45
    
@MrLister CSS also uses alphabetic characters, just like natural language, but still it doesn't surprise anyone that it terminates its statements with a ; instead of a .. :) –  GolezTrol Mar 29 '12 at 18:42

I don't know if it's a coincidence, but ! is the earliest non-system and non-whitespace character in the ASCII table (at #32). In terms of parsing, would that make it quicker?

No. And most language design committees would prefer to choose an easy-to-learn, easy-to-remember, and easy-to-type syntax over any minor benefit from having smaller byte values.

Hand-rolled parsers sometimes use lookup-tables to classify tokens based on the first character. For example, Mozilla's JS engine has the following in jsscan.cpp which defines the lexer:

static const uint8 firstCharKinds[] = {
/*         0        1        2        3        4        5        6        7        8        9    */
/*   0+ */ _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______,   Space,
/*  10+ */     EOL,   Space,   Space,     EOL, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______,
/*  20+ */ _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______, _______,
/*  30+ */ _______, _______,   Space, _______,  String, _______,   Ident, _______, _______,  String,
/*  40+ */ OneChar, OneChar, _______,    Plus, OneChar, _______,     Dot, _______,  HexOct,     Dec,
/*  50+ */     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,     Dec,   Colon, OneChar,
...

but using | over ! won't let you make such a table much smaller. CSS and HTML are heavyweight so memory-constrained devices tend not to parse CSS and saving a few bytes ('|' - 'z' == 2) in the lexer is not going to affect browser performance significantly.

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If you think about it, sorting properties in ASCII order, anything starting with "!" would appear first. My guess is it was just easier to parse this way.

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Easier because ! is earlier in the ASCII character set you mean? I've added a note about that in the question. –  Blowski Mar 29 '12 at 15:54
    
It may be. I'm just guessing. I did manage to get a classified as to the first on the list in a newspaper once by starting the title with "!", after consulting the ASCII table. :) –  Diodeus Mar 29 '12 at 16:35
    
!important appears after the property value, not in the property name which is presumably what you would sort by. –  Mike Samuel Mar 29 '12 at 16:55

I think it is because they had to choose something to make it distinguishable from regular CSS code. And it must be before the important because if it was behind, the important could have been read as a value and not a token. But it's rather a guess.

And maybe it is a keyboard layout decision. On german keyboards some tokens are harder to type than on englisch keyboards { is a Alt Gr 7 for example. ! is the same on german keyboads as on english ones. Someone maybe had mercy with foreign spoken persons. Again a guess.

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