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I wrote this. Yes, I know it's VB6. Yes, it is production code, and, yeah, I know it uses gotos. I am a lazy, evil beast ...

So show me (and the rest of us) how it should be written

Public Function SplitString(ByVal sText As Variant) As Variant
    Dim nHere As Long
    Dim cHere As String * 1
    Dim aRes As Variant
    Dim nRes As Long
    Dim bInquote As Boolean
    Dim sString As String
    ReDim aRes(0)
    nHere = 1
    nRes = 0
    Do
	If nHere > Len(sText) Then Exit Do
	cHere = Mid$(sText, nHere, 1)
	If cHere = Chr$(32) Then
	    If bInquote Then
		sString = sString & cHere
		GoTo nextChar
	    End If
	    If sString <> vbNullString Then
		aRes(nRes) = sString
		sString = vbNullString
		nRes = nRes + 1
		ReDim Preserve aRes(nRes)
	    End If
	    GoTo nextChar
	ElseIf cHere = Chr$(34) Then
	    bInquote = Not bInquote
	    GoTo nextChar
	Else
	    sString = sString & cHere
	End If
nextChar:
	nHere = nHere + 1
    Loop
    If sString <> vbNullString Then
	aRes(nRes) = sString
    End If
    SplitString = aRes
End Function

By the way, it splits a string into an array. The elements in the string may be quoted.

share|improve this question
3  
Why do you think it is fast and readable at the moment? –  anon Jun 14 '09 at 13:53
    
Are you telling me it's neither? –  boost Jun 14 '09 at 14:06
    
The DO loop should be a counting (FOR?) loop. That would eliminate the need for the nextChar label. You might optimize things a bit by not recomputing LEN(sText) on each iteration (it doesn't change). Actually, even with the DO loop, you don't need the label if you restructure the space handling to use ELSEIF instead of consecutive IF statements. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 14 '09 at 15:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I agree that this particular bit of logic should be clearly and easily implemented using Split() and Join() operations. While one can always write a long run of inline code that improves on them in speed there are two reasons not to:

  • The performance difference probably will not even approach a factor of 1.5 and such logic is seldom used millions of times on extremely large strings.
  • Such inline logic is not only opaque and difficult to maintain, it is hard to get right the first time when writing the program.

Example:

Function SplitString(ByVal Text As String) As String()
    Dim Slices() As String
    Dim UnquotedSlice As Long

    Slices = Split(Text, """")
    For UnquotedSlice = 0 To UBound(Slices) Step 2
        Slices(UnquotedSlice) = Replace$(Slices(UnquotedSlice), " ", vbNullChar)
    Next
    SplitString = Split(Join$(Slices, ""), vbNullChar)
End Function

BTW: Kudos to anyone who can fix the perverse code-quoting markup this site uses in my example above.

Edit: Nevermind, I winkled it out. The bulletted list gave the parser a spasm.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's impressive stuff! I would never have thought of that approach in million years. –  boost Jun 14 '09 at 16:09
    
It isn't perfect. The occurrence of multiple space runs outside the quotes will result in a few empty elements in the resulting array. You could try collapsing those spaces in each unquoted "slice" though. –  Bob Jun 14 '09 at 20:09
    
Ah, yes, just discovered that and was about to point it out, but you've beaten me to the punch. –  boost Jun 15 '09 at 13:00

It's pretty simple:

Change "If sString <> vbNullString Then" to "ElseIf sString <> vbNullString Then", remove all "Goto"s and remove "nextChar:".

Public Function SplitString(ByVal sText As Variant) As Variant
    Dim nHere As Long
    Dim cHere As String * 1
    Dim aRes As Variant
    Dim nRes As Long
    Dim bInquote As Boolean
    Dim sString As String
    ReDim aRes(0)
    nHere = 1
    nRes = 0
    Do
        If nHere > Len(sText) Then Exit Do
        cHere = Mid$(sText, nHere, 1)
        If cHere = Chr$(32) Then
            If bInquote Then
                sString = sString & cHere
            ElseIf sString <> vbNullString Then
                aRes(nRes) = sString
                sString = vbNullString
                nRes = nRes + 1
                ReDim Preserve aRes(nRes)
            End If
        ElseIf cHere = Chr$(34) Then
            bInquote = Not bInquote
        Else
            sString = sString & cHere
        End If

        nHere = nHere + 1
    Loop
    If sString <> vbNullString Then
        aRes(nRes) = sString
    End If
    SplitString = aRes
End Function
share|improve this answer

You should have a look here, for an idea of how subtle optimizations affect this sort of task:

http://www.xbeat.net/vbspeed/c_Split.htm

You'll see that amongst those algorithms, there is no best one, but rather some pretty good ones and then some that can really whoop the outlyers a bit better than others.

share|improve this answer

I heard a rule of thumb that says that if your goto jumps forward, it's probably okay. This looks like one of those cases. If you can reverse the logic of a predicate, though, seems easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting take on the issue. At the assembler level, of course, everything pretty much resolves to gotos (a.k.a. jumps) –  boost Jun 14 '09 at 15:21
    
There's another rule of thumb: don't GOTO where you would end up anyway. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 14 '09 at 15:30

Looks pretty straight forward. Just make use of the if/else structure. If your code enters an if block, it will never enter corresponding elseif or else blocks. A lot of your goto statements aren't even needed in the first place.

Public Function SplitString(ByVal sText As Variant) As Variant
    Dim nHere As Long
    Dim cHere As String * 1
    Dim aRes As Variant
    Dim nRes As Long
    Dim bInquote As Boolean
    Dim sString As String
    ReDim aRes(0)
    nHere = 1
    nRes = 0
    Do
        If nHere > Len(sText) Then Exit Do
        cHere = Mid$(sText, nHere, 1)
        If cHere = Chr$(32) Then
            If bInquote Then
                sString = sString & cHere
            ElseIf sString <> vbNullString Then
                aRes(nRes) = sString
                sString = vbNullString
                nRes = nRes + 1
                ReDim Preserve aRes(nRes)
            End If
        ElseIf cHere = Chr$(34) Then
            bInquote = Not bInquote
        Else
            sString = sString & cHere
        End If
        nHere = nHere + 1
    Loop
    If sString <> vbNullString Then
        aRes(nRes) = sString
    End If
    SplitString = aRes
End Function
share|improve this answer

I'd simply use the Split function and Join functions that is native to VB6. I'll leave the details to you but the basic flow is to split on the spaces and then rejoin objects that are between the quotes.

I've not written VB6 in years and I don't have the software installed (for debugging) so I don't want to take a stab at the function.

Best Luck,
Frank

share|improve this answer
    
But if you'd read the code, I was also wanting to be able to split strings like my dog "has fleas" into an array "my", "dog", "has fleas" –  boost Jun 14 '09 at 14:24
    
And if you read my link, you'd see the JOIN function would would still allow you to implement your concept. In addition, the code isn't "readable". –  Frank V Jun 14 '09 at 14:34
    
Please could you unpack just how Split and Join do the job? It's late at night here in Australia, and I'm not thinking too well. –  boost Jun 14 '09 at 15:16

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