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i came across the following ex, of displaying only the department name of employess present in the deptno 20:

     EMPNO ENAME          DEPTNO DNAME
---------- ---------- ---------- --------------
      7902 FORD               20 RESEARCH
      7876 ADAMS              20 RESEARCH
      7788 SCOTT              20 RESEARCH
      7566 JONES              20 RESEARCH
      7369 SMITH              20 RESEARCH
      7934 MILLER
      7839 KING
      7782 CLARK
      7900 JAMES
      7844 TURNER
      7698 BLAKE

     EMPNO ENAME          DEPTNO DNAME
---------- ---------- ---------- --------------
      7654 MARTIN
      7521 WARD
      7499 ALLEN

The query used is

select e.empno, e.ename, d.deptno, d.dname  
from emp e, dept d  where (e.deptno = d.deptno(+)) and d.deptno(+) = 20

Removing a outer join from (e.deptno = d.deptno(+)) displays only 5 rows, but should this too work?

select e.empno, e.ename, d.deptno, d.dname  
from emp e, dept d  where (e.deptno = d.deptno) and d.deptno(+) = 20

is the d.deptno(+) = 20 evaluated first?

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2  
I'd avoid writing statements like that like the plague. Besides the use of the implicit join syntax (usually considered an antipattern), the specialized contruct for specifying a join isn't supported everywhere (doesn't work on DB2, anyways). And SQL doesn't have the concept of short-circuit logic, exactly - so you don't have any real guarantee of which statement evaluates 'first'. I'd imagine your join in the second would be coerced to an inner join. –  Clockwork-Muse Mar 29 '12 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First off please use the standard ANSI join syntax...

The reason for your difference is that the actual join condition is a inner join, e.deptno = d.deptno. This means that no matter what else you do - like trying to use depno as a left outer join - you've turned your query into an inner join.

Incidentally, in your first query placing d.deptno in a where clause would have done the same thing.

Personally, I'd write it like this:

select e.empno, e.ename, d.deptno, d.dname  
  from emp e
  left outer join ( select deptno, dname 
                      from dept 
                     where deptno = 20 )
    on e.deptno = d.deptno

Oracle is generally very good at assessing these queries and should do the correct thing.

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Check the query plan with:

EXPLAIN PLAN FOR select e.empno, e.ename, d.deptno, d.dname  from emp e, dept d  where (e.deptno = d.deptno(+)) and d.deptno(+) = 20

EXPLAIN PLAN FOR select e.empno, e.ename, d.deptno, d.dname  from emp e, dept d  where (e.deptno = d.deptno) and d.deptno(+) = 20

More info: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B10500_01/server.920/a96533/ex_plan.htm

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