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Possible Duplicate:
linq to sql recursive query

I got stuck with having to build a Recursive select via LINQ for the self referencing table.

enter image description here

I use this class:

public class DivisionHierarchy
{
    public Division Division { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<DivisionHierarchy> Divisions { get; set; }
}

and I created this function but somehow it is infinite.

public IEnumerable<DivisionHierarchy> GetDivisionHierarchy(IEnumerable<Division> allDivisions, Division parentDivision)
{
    Guid? parentDivisionId = null;

    if (parentDivision != null)
         parentDivisionId = parentDivision.DivisionID;

    var childDivisions = allDivisions.Where(e => e.DivisionID == parentDivisionId);

    Collection<DivisionHierarchy> hierarchy = new Collection<DivisionHierarchy>();

    foreach (var div in childDivisions)
       hierarchy.Add(new DivisionHierarchy() { Division = div, Divisions = GetDivisionHierarchy(allDivisions, div) });

     return hierarchy;
}

Any clue where I can start?

Thank you!

P.S. Are there any others ways to do it?


UPDATES based on http://www.scip.be/index.php?Page=ArticlesNET18#AsHierarchy

I found my errors.

There are 2 things to implement: 1. The root node should be created under the database.

enter image description here

  1. I changed code a little bit.

    Guid divisionID = Guid.Parse("5b487b3d-e9be-413f-b611-2fd7491e0d0d"); // Hardcoded somehow
    var rootDivision = db.Divisions.Where(i => i.ID == divisionID).FirstOrDefault();
    var divisionHierarchy = GetDivisionHierarchy(db.Divisions.AsEnumerable(), rootDivision);
    

    ...

     public IEnumerable<DivisionHierarchy> GetDivisionHierarchy(IEnumerable<Division> allDivisions, Division parentDivision)
            {
                Guid? parentDivisionId = null;
    
                if (parentDivision != null)
                    parentDivisionId = parentDivision.ID;
    
                var childDivisions = allDivisions.Where(division => division.DivisionID == parentDivisionId);
    
                Collection<DivisionHierarchy> hierarchy = new Collection<DivisionHierarchy>();
    
                foreach (var div in childDivisions)
                {
                    DivisionHierarchy divisionHierarchy = new DivisionHierarchy();
                    divisionHierarchy.Division = div;
                    divisionHierarchy.Divisions = GetDivisionHierarchy(allDivisions, div);
                    hierarchy.Add(divisionHierarchy);
                }
    
                return hierarchy;
            }
    
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Tim Post Apr 1 '12 at 4:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Have you tried to search for the answer at least at stack overflow? stackoverflow.com/questions/4072166/linq-to-sql-recursive-query Looks like a straight duplicate. – Ruslan Mar 29 '12 at 16:00
    
@Ruslan It doesn't has the answer I need. I need to get the entire tree into some var. – Dimi Mar 29 '12 at 16:05
    
@Peretz If you need the whole thing then you're best off just pulling down the list as is and mapping it to a tree in memory. – Servy Mar 29 '12 at 16:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would load the divisions in an non-recursive way and then set up the recursive relations in code. Here is an example, which does this in a lazy way

public class Division
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int DivisionID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    private static List<Division> _divisions;
    public static List<Division> Divisions
    {
        get
        {
            if (_divisions == null) {
                LoadAndSetUpDivisionsHierarchy();
            }
            return _divisions;
        }
    }

    private static Dictionary<int, Division> _divisionsByID;
    public static Dictionary<int, Division> DivisionsByID
    {
        get
        {
            if (_divisionsByID == null) {
                LoadAndSetUpDivisionsHierarchy();
            }
            return _divisionsByID;
        }
    }

    private static Division _root;
    public static Division Root
    {
        get
        {
            if (_root == null) {
                LoadAndSetUpDivisionsHierarchy();
            }
            return _root;
        }
    }

    private Division _parentDivision;
    public Division ParentDivision
    {
        get
        {
            if (_parentDivision == null && DivisionID != 0) {
                _parentDivision = DivisionsByID[DivisionID];

            }
            return _parentDivision;
        }
    }

    private List<Division> _subDivisions = new List<Division>();
    public List<Division> SubDivisions
    {
        get { return _subDivisions; }
    }

    private static void LoadAndSetUpDivisionsHierarchyHierarchy()
    {
        // Load the divisions in a non-recursive way using LINQ
        // (details not shown here).
        _divisions = LoadDivisions();

        // Add the divisions in a dictionary by id
        _divisionsByID = new Dictionary<int, Division>(_divisions.Count);
        foreach (Division division in _divisions) {
            _divisionsByID.Add(division.ID, division);
        }

        // Define sub-divisions and root division
        foreach (Division division in _divisions) {
            if (division.DivisionID == 0) {
                _root = division;
            } else if (division.ParentDivision != null) {
                division.ParentDivision.SubDivisions.Add(division);
            }
        }
    }

    private static List<Division> LoadDivisions()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input!!! Let me investigate it... – Dimi Mar 29 '12 at 16:33
1  
Laziness is good for infinite recursion. – Jodrell Mar 29 '12 at 16:35
    
I added a static Root property and code define its value. Root is the entry point into the hierarchy. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 29 '12 at 19:16
    
I completed the hierarchy by adding sub-divisions. Now the divisions build a hierarchy by themselves and do not require a separate data structure for a hierarchy. The hierachy is access through the static Root property. In addition, you can access a list (Divisions) and a dictionary of divisions (DivisionsByID) given as static properties. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 30 '12 at 13:31

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