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As a followup to this question, is it possible to write a single method that adds a Dog to a suitable room? (In this example, it would accept either an Animal room or a Dog room.) Or am I forced to write two distinct methods as below? (I can't even rely on overloading because of type erasure).

public class Rooms {
   interface Animal {}
   class Dog implements Animal {}
   class Room<T> {
      void add(T t) {}
   }

   void addDogToAnimalRoom(Room<Animal> room) {
      room.add(new Dog());
   }

   void addDogToDogRoom(Room<Dog> room) {
      room.add(new Dog());
   }   
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're using Room as a consumer, since it's accepting the new Dog, so Josh Bloch's famous PECS acronym applies.

void addDogToDogRoom(Room<? super Dog> room) {
  room.add(new Dog());
}
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1  
Oh that's what super is for :) –  Jeff Axelrod Mar 29 '12 at 16:22
3  
Yep! You're using List as a consumer, since it's accepting the new Dog, so Josh Bloch's famous PECS acronym applies. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 29 '12 at 16:23
    
This is the danger of learn-as-you-go programming. I "read" his book, but only the parts that were relevant at the time. I think understanding this could have saved me much unnecessary refactoring. Please feel free to suggest (or just edit) a better question title. –  Jeff Axelrod Mar 29 '12 at 16:28

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