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Is there any rules to access shared memory at the same time in multicores? If one core is writing the shared memory, another core is reading the same memory at the exact same time, is there any problem with that? SHALL This kind of scenario be avoided?

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2 Answers 2

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This is called a race condition and the result of such code will be unpredictable. You HAVE to avoid it. You can either:

  • change the algorithm to use separate memory, or
  • synchronize access by using atomic operations, or
  • synchronize access by using higher-level synchronization constructs, like critical section or a mutex.

As @DanDan said, only reading from several threads is not a problem.

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Is it ok to use Mutual-exclusion semaphore to avoid this? E.G.: one core if(!LOCK) LOCK=TRUE; another core if(!LOCK) LOCK=TRUE, and LOCK is shared between two CORES. When one core is executing LOCK=TRUE, another core happens to executing if(!LOCK) at the same time, is it OK to do that? –  shikun Mar 30 '12 at 3:35
    
No, that's also a race condition on the boolean variable. You have to use a proper mutex object (whatever that means for your language/OS). –  Lubo Antonov Mar 30 '12 at 7:15

Yes, you need to avoid this. The only thing you can do safely with multi-cores and multi-threads is read simultaneously - and only if that has no side effects.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it ok to use Mutual-exclusion semaphore to avoid this? E.G.: one core if(!LOCK) LOCK=TRUE; another core if(!LOCK) LOCK=TRUE, and LOCK is shared between two CORES. When one core is executing LOCK=TRUE, another core happens to executing if(!LOCK) at the same time, is it OK to do that? –  shikun Mar 30 '12 at 7:52
    
what if there's no OS on the board, shall we use IRQ to avoid cores to access simultaneously? Any other advice on that? –  shikun Mar 30 '12 at 8:10

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