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It seems that my math is not enough for my current task, so thats why i would like to ask help. The main thing is solved, i display the divs in elipsis shape, but i cannot solve how to take care to the dimension of the divs. The current solution works for shapes with equal sides, but my divs are not like that, their width are bigger than their height.

The current function look like this:

function drawEllipse(selector, x, y, a, b, angle) {
var steps = jQuery(selector).length;
var i = 0;
var beta = -angle * (Math.PI / 180);
var sinbeta = Math.sin(beta);
var cosbeta = Math.cos(beta);

jQuery(selector).each(function(index) {
    var alpha = i * (Math.PI / 180);
    i += (360 / steps);
    var sinalpha = Math.sin(alpha);
    var cosalpha = Math.cos(alpha);
    var X = x + (a * sinalpha * cosbeta - b * cosalpha * sinbeta);
    var Y = y - (a * sinalpha * sinbeta + b * cosalpha * cosbeta);
    X = Math.floor(X);
    Y = Math.floor(Y);

    //again, here's where the important X and Y coordinates are being output
    jQuery(this).css('margin-top', Y + 'px');
    jQuery(this).css('margin-left', X + 'px');
});
}

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You could use Raphael... –  elclanrs Mar 29 '12 at 18:39
1  
Could you show us the HTML code and how you invoke drawEllipse (or set up a jsfiddle)? –  Bergi Mar 29 '12 at 18:41
    
it is somethig like Jeff B did below –  Joooe Mar 29 '12 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

Instead of offsetting your divs with margin, why don't you use position: absolute? Then you can place them exactly where you want them.

You can combine this with a negative margin of half the div's width and height to center them at that position.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jtbowden/gRb5r/

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, but this wont solve my problem. I mean if you call the function, and the target divs width are for expmple 100px, and their height are 50px, then you will see, that in the upper, and bottom part of the elipsis the divs overlaps each other, but in the middle part there is a bunch of unnecessary space between them. So the point is to achieve equal gaps between the elements. –  Joooe Mar 29 '12 at 19:32
    
That's actually somewhat complicated, especially because a lot of it is more of a "looking right" thing and less of a calculation thing. For instance, if two divs are diagonal to each other, how do you space them? The diagonal distance from closest points? The horizontal distance and vertical distance? Each of these ways will look wrong on some part of the ellipse. If your divs were all circles, it would be easy... –  Jeff B Mar 29 '12 at 21:33
    
Also, as your ellipse is more oblique, or rather, as the major and minor axes move further from being equal, the points will be further apart on the "wide" sides, and closer on the narrow ends, even if the divs are the same dimensions. It will take a different parametric equation to make them evenly spaced around the ellipse. –  Jeff B Mar 29 '12 at 21:59
    
So it is a hard task indeed. My only idea was, that in this case, we split the elipsis in x equal parts, where x equals the number of the divs. So i tought, maybe the solution would be, if i would split the elipse to x*10 equal parts, and put the divs distributed acourding a function (lets say a sin() function) –  Joooe Mar 30 '12 at 7:03
    
And actualy in my case, you dont have to worry about the angle of the elipsis, it is set to 0. –  Joooe Mar 30 '12 at 7:05

I was able to make your code work by this (needed it for very different reason):

Plugin.prototype.drawEllipse = function (element, x, y, a, b, angle) {
    var steps = 120;
    var i = 0;
    var beta = -angle * (Math.PI / 180);
    var sinbeta = Math.sin(beta);
    var cosbeta = Math.cos(beta);

    for (var i=0; i<steps; i++) {
        element.html(element.html() + "<div class='ellipsemarker'></div>");
    }

    $('.ellipsemarker').each(function(index) {
        var alpha = i * (Math.PI / 180);
        i += (360 / steps);
        var sinalpha = Math.sin(alpha);
        var cosalpha = Math.cos(alpha);
        var X = x + (a * sinalpha * cosbeta - b * cosalpha * sinbeta);
        var Y = y - (a * sinalpha * sinbeta + b * cosalpha * cosbeta);
        X = Math.floor(X);
        Y = Math.floor(Y);

        //again, here's where the important X and Y coordinates are being output
        $(this).css('top', Y + 'px');
        $(this).css('left', X + 'px');
    });
};

Sorry about the refactoring, most of that is personal preference things. The CSS that makes these constrained in width and height was (in my case):

.ellipsemarker {
    background-color: #fff;
    border: #e8e8e8 2px solid;
    width: 15px;
    height: 10px;
    position: absolute;
}

Note the position: absolute as another poster suggested.

The supplementary calling code in my case was this, just for reference:

var x, y;
var pos = $('#ringwrapper').position();
x = pos.left;
y = pos.top;
console.log(x + " : " + y);

this.drawEllipse($('#ringwrapper'), x + (this.ringSize.width / 2.85), 
    y + (this.ringSize.height / 3.1), 235, 350, 90);
share|improve this answer
    
keyringlabs.com -- game with above code running –  Peter Tracey Jan 25 at 23:23

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