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I have the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

struct A{};
struct B: public A {};

template <typename T>
void foo(const T& obj) { cerr << "Generic case"<< endl;}

void foo(const A& a) {
    cerr << "Specific case" << endl;
}

int main() {
    vector<int> v;
    foo(v);
    B b;
    foo(b);
    A a;
    foo(a);
}

Output is

  • Generic case
  • Generic case
  • Specific case

Why is it that foo(const A& a) is not being chosen for the B object ?

Curiously enough, if I removed the templated method and just have the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct A{};
struct B: public A {};

//template <typename T>
//void foo(const T& obj) { cerr << "Generic case"<< endl;}

void foo(const A& a) {
    cerr << "Specific case" << endl;
}

int main() {
    B b;
    foo(b);
    A a;
    foo(a);
}

The code compiles and the output is:

Specific case
Specific case

Why is the presence of the templated method making such a difference?

Edit: How can I force the compiler to choose the free method for classes derived from A in the presence of the templated method?

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

No conversion is necessary for the call to foo(const B&) which the template instantiation yields thus it is the better match.

When a function call is seen by the compiler, every base function template has to be instantiated and is included in the overload set along with every normal function. After that overload resolution is performed. There is also SFINAE, which allows an instantiation of a function template to lead to an error (such a function would not be added to the overload set). Of course, things aren't really that simple, but it should give the general picture.

Regarding your edit: There is only one method to call. What else could there be as output?

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yes - having only the one method does simplify things. I guess I was expecting the const B& call to fail in that case as well. –  ATemp Mar 29 '12 at 18:57
    
B is a direct child of A. It can be bound to an A& or const A&. –  pmr Mar 29 '12 at 19:01
    
And now I realize I've spent some 31 minutes composing my answer... SO eats my time :x –  Matthieu M. Mar 29 '12 at 19:22
    
@MatthieuM. I feel sorry for you. I'll buy you a beer should there ever be a Sophia-Antipolis SO meeting ;) –  pmr Mar 29 '12 at 19:36
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Yes, it is a bit surprising but inheritance and template don't mix so well when it come to overload resolution.

The thing is, when evaluating which overload should be selected, the compiler chooses the one that necessitates the least conversions (built-in to built-in, derived-to-base, calls to non-explicit constructors or conversion operators, etc...). The ranking algorithm is actually pretty complex (not all conversions are treated the same...).

Once the overloads are ranked, if the two top-most are ranked the same and one is a template, then the template is discarded. However, if the template ranks higher than the non-template (less conversions, usually), then the template is selected.

In your case:

  • for std::vector<int> only one overload matches, so it is selected.
  • for A two overloads match, they rank equally, the template one is discarded.
  • for B two overloads match, the template rank higher (no derived-to-base conversion required), it is selected.

There are two work-arounds, the simplest is to "fix" the call site:

A const& ba = b;
foo(ba);

The other is to fix the template itself, however this is trickier...

You can hardcode that for classes derived from A this is not the overload you wish for:

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<not std::is_base_of<A, T>::value>::type
foo(T const& t) {
  std::cerr << "Generic case\n";
}

However this is not so flexible...

Another solution is to define a hook. First we need some metaprogramming utility:

// Utility
template <typename T, typename Result = void>
struct enable: std::enable_if< std::is_same<T, std::true_type>::value > {}; 

template <typename T, typename Result = void>
struct disable: std::enable_if< not std::is_same<T, std::true_type>::value > {}; 

And then we define our hook and function:

std::false_type has_specific_foo(...);

template <typename T>
auto foo(T const& t) -> typename disable<decltype(has_specific_foo(t))>::type {
  std::cerr << "Generic case\n";
}

And then for each base class we want a specific foo:

std::true_type has_specific_foo(A const&);

In action at ideone.

It is possible in C++03 too, but slightly more cumbersome. The idea is the same though, an ellipsis argument ... has the worst rank, so we can use overload selection on another function to drive the choice of the primary one.

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@pmr's answer explains why the templated function is preferred in your example. To force the compiler to pick your overload instead, you can make use of SFINAE to drop the templated function from the overload set. Change the templated foo to

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_base_of<A, T>::value>::type
  foo(const T& obj) { cerr << "Generic case"<< endl;}

Now, if T is A or a class derived from A the templated function's return type is invalid and it will be excluded from overload resolution. enable_if is present in the type_traits header.

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Dont I have to return something from foo() as well ? What if I wanted to keep the method signatures the same. Is it possible to change code inside foo() and use enable_if to prevent instantiation due to foo()'s method body? –  ATemp Mar 29 '12 at 20:41
    
@ATemp enable_if has 2 template arguments, the second of which is the return type. It is defaulted to void which is why I omitted it in the example. If you have a different return type simply add the second template argument. You can't prevent the templated function from being selected during overload resolution due to the code within its body. –  Praetorian Mar 29 '12 at 22:07
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