Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example:

CGSize winSize = [[CCDirector sharedDirector] winSize];
int x = MAX(position.x, winSize.width /2);
    int y = MAX(position.y, winSize.height /2);
    x = MIN(x, (_tileMap.mapSize.width * _tileMap.tileSize.width)
            - winSize.width /2);
    y = MIN(y, (_tileMap.mapSize.height *_tileMap.tileSize.height)
            -winSize.height/2);
    CGPoint actualPosition = ccp(x, y);

    CGPoint centerOfView = ccp(winSize.width/2, winSize.height/2);
    self.position = centerOfView;

Note the MAX which is defined in NSObject. I am still hazy what it does. I tried looking it up in the text documentation but got no relevant result.

Similarly, does ccp just take two coordinates and save them into one point?

E.G.

CGPoint centerOfView = ccp(winSize.width/2, winSize.height/2);

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
It's a macro that takes two expressions, evaluates them, and returns the larger value of the two. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 29 '12 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

MAX simply returns the MAX value of the items in parenthesis. For example, MAX(5,3) would return 5.

If x=1 and y=10, then MAX(y,x) would return y.

ccp is a wrapper around CGPointMake and it simply creates a CGPoint, which is made up of two values, x and y, to create a 2D coordinate. Look up CGPointMake as that is exactly what ccp is.

share|improve this answer

In Xcode hold Command and click the function for its definition.

#define MAX(A,B)({ __typeof__(A) __a = (A); __typeof__(B) __b = (B); __a < __b ? __b : __a; })

ccp is defined as

#define ccp(__X__,__Y__) CGPointMake(__X__,__Y__)

To see the file where it's all defined hold command and click on the function. Xcode will loop up the symbol.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.