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Lets say that I have three tables, customers, orders and orderDetails.

I'm doing this:

SELECT orders.ordersId, sum(orderDetails.total)
FROM orders
LEFT OUTER JOIN orderDetails ON orders.ordersId = orderDetails.ordersId 
GROUP BY orders.ordersId 

But lets say the orders table contains customersId. How do I join on the customers table so that I can also add the customer's name to the fields selected?

Thanks,

Barry

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Use a LEFT OUTER JOIN on table customers? –  Francis P Mar 29 '12 at 19:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can do it this way, which will let you get more than customer name if needed:

SELECT o.ordersId, o.orderTotal, c.customername, c.(other customer data)
FROM 
(
    SELECT orders.ordersId
            , sum(orderDetails.total) as orderTotal
            , orders.customersid
    FROM orders
    LEFT OUTER JOIN orderDetails 
            ON orders.ordersId = orderDetails.ordersId 
    GROUP BY orders.ordersId, orders.customersid
) o
LEFT JOIN customers c
    ON o.customersid = c.customersid
share|improve this answer
    
Your inner query doesn't return the field customersid, so it can't be referenced or joined on in the outer query. It needs adding to both the SELECT and GROUP BY of the inner query. –  MatBailie Mar 29 '12 at 19:45
    
@Dems nice catch, thanks for pointing that out. this has been fixed. –  bluefeet Mar 29 '12 at 19:46
SELECT orders.ordersId, sum(orderDetails.total), customer.name
FROM orders
LEFT OUTER JOIN orderDetails ON orders.ordersId = orderDetails.ordersId
LEFT OUTER JOIN customer on customer.customerid = orders.customerid 
GROUP BY orders.ordersId , customer.name

Try that out or something similar.

share|improve this answer
    
This does work, and has nothing wrong with it, but it doesn't actually scale very well when returning multiple additional fields from multiple tables. For maintainability I prefer to join on a sub-query, but I can't vote for it at the moment because the only answer like that is wrong ;) –  MatBailie Mar 29 '12 at 19:47
    
In looking again I would have to agree with the sub query method too. This is the simplistic answer with your current queries posted. ;) –  Adam Mar 29 '12 at 19:48

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