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Using C#, I have created a program that executes a command line perl script and captures the output to a text file. The output is from ClearCase and was a huge pain to figure out, there isnt much in the way of documentation of the ClearCase plugin.

Anyhow now what I would like to do is skip the file and only use the output from the console...

The output appears like

"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\@@main\branch\version\4"
"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\somefile.txt@@main\branch\version\3"
"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\somefile.txt@@\branch\version\1"

I then want to basically load that into a tree view. So that the tree appears as a directory listing...that could be sortable so it is easy to tell the latest version of any particular file or directory.

One problem is there are multiple instances of the same directory and files as each version of a particular file is counted and there may be different branches and versions...

I have trouble because I am only slightly experienced with C# and I can't quite comprehend how to load arrays in arrays then have it neatly go to a dynamic tree view (keeping its associations).

Most online examples for tree views I find have hard coded strings, not dynamic strings[].

Does anyone have any experience doing this? Or know of any tricks? I cant decide if Visual Studio's line editing is best to use to split the directories or to use a regex...I will at a later point (once I get this figured out) want to Re-send this data into clearcase via command prompt to auto checkout these associated files...but that part seems easier from this point of view...

I can't post the code that I have, closed loop lan only.

The example of treeview that I've been scratching my head on is from DotNetPerls :

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //
    // This is the first node in the view.
    //
    TreeNode treeNode = new TreeNode("Windows");
    treeView1.Nodes.Add(treeNode);
    //
    // Another node following the first node.
    //
    treeNode = new TreeNode("Linux");
    treeView1.Nodes.Add(treeNode);
    //
    // Create two child nodes and put them in an array.
    // ... Add the third node, and specify these as its children.
    //
    TreeNode node2 = new TreeNode("C#");
    TreeNode node3 = new TreeNode("VB.NET");
    TreeNode[] array = new TreeNode[] { node2, node3 };
    //
    // Final node.
    //
    treeNode = new TreeNode("Dot Net Perls", array);
    treeView1.Nodes.Add(treeNode);

and for arrays to tree from D.Morton @ MSDN

public void AddTreeViewItem(string[] item)  
{  
TreeNodeCollection nodes = treeView1.Nodes;  

for (int i = 0; i < item.Length; i++)  
    nodes = nodes.Find(item[i], false).Length > 0 ? nodes.Find(item[i], false)
[0].  Nodes : nodes.Add(item[i], item[i]).Nodes;  
} 
share|improve this question
2  
If you can't post your code, then post some code that has a similar problem, from home or elsewhere. –  John Saunders Mar 29 '12 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The TreeBuilder class below will build a proper tree for you. I've tested it with your examples and it works. Where there are gaps in the tree it will recursively trim the path to create the missing parent nodes and then unwind to add the item itself. The TreeBuilder breaks the problem into handling file paths and version paths by splitting your lines at the @@. It treats the version path as a child of the file path. This allows the built in Path.GetFileName and Path.GetDirectoryName functions to be used to label the nodes and trim the paths to find parents.

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.IO;

public class TreeBuilder
{
    public TreeBuilder()
    {
        TreeNode rootNode = new TreeNode(@"\");
        rootNode.Name = @"\";

        RootNode = rootNode;
    }

    public TreeNode RootNode
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void AddItems(string[] items)
    {
        Array.Sort(items);

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(RootNode.Name))
        {
            RootNode.Name = @"\";
        }

        foreach (string item in items)
        {
            string[] itemParts = item.Split(new string[] { "@@" }, StringSplitOptions.None);
            string filePath = itemParts[0].TrimEnd('\\');
            string versionPath = itemParts[1];

            TreeNode fileNode = AddNode(RootNode, filePath);
            TreeNode versionNode = AddNode(fileNode, filePath + "@@", versionPath);
        }
    }

    public TreeNode AddNode(TreeNode topNode, string path)
    {
        return AddNode(topNode, null, path);
    }

    public TreeNode AddNode(TreeNode topNode, string pathPrefix, string path)
    {
        pathPrefix = pathPrefix ?? string.Empty;

        TreeNode node = null;

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(path) && topNode.Name != path)
        {
            string parentPath = Path.GetDirectoryName(path);

            TreeNode[] matchingNodes = topNode.Nodes.Find(pathPrefix + path, true);

            if (matchingNodes == null || matchingNodes.Length == 0)
            {
                string nodeLabel = Path.GetFileName(path);
                nodeLabel = string.IsNullOrEmpty(nodeLabel) ? @"\" : nodeLabel;

                node = new TreeNode(nodeLabel);
                node.Name = pathPrefix + path;

                TreeNode[] parentNodes = topNode.Nodes.Find(pathPrefix + parentPath, true);
                TreeNode parentNode = null;

                if (parentNodes != null && parentNodes.Length > 0)
                {
                    parentNode = parentNodes[0];
                    parentNode.Nodes.Add(node);
                }
                else
                {
                    parentNode = AddNode(topNode, pathPrefix, parentPath);
                    parentNode.Nodes.Add(node);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                node = matchingNodes[0];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            node = topNode;
        }

        return node;
    }
}

Here's an example of how you'd use it in a form with a TreeView on it:

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string[] fileStrings = new String[]
            {
                @"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\@@main\branch\version\4",
                @"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\somefile.txt@@main\branch\version\3",
                @"\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\somefile.txt@@\branch\version\1"
            };

        TreeBuilder treeBuilder = new TreeBuilder();
        treeBuilder.AddItems(fileStrings);

        treeView1.Nodes.Add(treeBuilder.RootNode);
        treeView1.ExpandAll();
    }

    private void treeView1_AfterSelect(object sender, TreeViewEventArgs e)
    {
        TreeNode selectedNode = treeView1.SelectedNode;
        MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Label: {0}\nClearCase path: {1}\nTree path: {2}", selectedNode.Text, selectedNode.Name, selectedNode.FullPath));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Updated my original answer to do some refactoring and add new code that can handle gaps in the tree. –  JamieSee Mar 30 '12 at 16:55
    
Wow Thanks! That is phenomenal! –  xSCM Apr 2 '12 at 11:56
    
You're welcome. Fortunately, I had to solve nearly the same problem when I wanted to do some tree displays of SQL Reporting Services catalog items so I was already familiar with the general terms of the solution and could adapt it. –  JamieSee Apr 2 '12 at 16:16
    
Yea thanks again... there isnt many examples of the treeview method online at all. I did run into two small problems, one I easily solved because there was some lines in the string that I did not account for that did not contain any of your coded matches, it threw an exception. I took them out and it ran ok until I ran into a Illegal Characters in path exception, the Characters are in the second path block "\r". Im working on parsing them out prior to loading them into the tree. I will post my completed code once I get this thing working. I have to rewrite the whole thing on this system anyway –  xSCM Apr 2 '12 at 19:51
    
You could write a couple of quick trimming functions to replace the Path. calls. I just used them to save time since your original examples looked like they complied with the Windows path spec once split. –  JamieSee Apr 2 '12 at 20:15

One of possible solutions could be split the string by directories:

string[] directories =     "\Directory\subDirectory\subsubDir\etc\dir\@@main\branch\version\4".Split(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar);

after have a Dictionary<string, List<string>> tree, where key is a Directory path, and List<string> a list of directories or files of "key" directory.

If it's not something you're searching for, please clarify.

share|improve this answer
    
In order to keep the file and branch associations would I need to keep the whole line as a string then load the individual dirs/subdirs to string and rematch the tree? Sorry if that's confusing im unsure of how to explain myself i suppose. –  xSCM Mar 29 '12 at 19:55
    
In case of branches I guess you can simply relay on Split call, you need to add to it also a parser for @@main or @@branch. –  Tigran Mar 29 '12 at 19:59
    
@Tigran Splitting on the directory separator is actually not the best way to go here. Since these are paths you can split them at @@ and then process the two paths using the functions from System.IO.Path. –  JamieSee Mar 30 '12 at 16:52
    
@JamieSee: correct. That what I suggested to do in my comment to OP. –  Tigran Mar 30 '12 at 17:04

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