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I am trying to plot something which is in this csv format: timestamp, value. But the values are not real numbers but rather abbreviations of large values (k = 1000, M = 1000000 etc).

2012-02-24 09:07:01, 8.1M
2012-02-24 09:07:02, 64.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:03, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:04, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:05, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:07, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:08, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:09, 84.8M
2012-02-24 09:07:10, 84.8M

I usually use numpy record array to store the csv using matplotlib.mlab.csv2rec(infile). But works only if the values are not in abbreviated form. Is there an easy way to do this without actually my program reading each value, looking for 'M' to convert 84.8M to 84800000?

share|improve this question
    
Why 84810000 and not 84800000? Am I missing something or are you asking how to get more information out of a number than there is? – Niklas B. Mar 29 '12 at 20:17
    
Well, you could simply change M with e6, etc. This would make that value a valid float. – Avaris Mar 29 '12 at 20:34
    
@NiklasB. Sorry that was a typo! You are right, it should be 84800000. – Ritesh Mar 29 '12 at 21:50
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Another possibility is the following conversion function:

conv = dict(zip('kMGT', (3, 6, 9, 12)))
def parse_number(value):
  if value[-1] in conv:
    value = '{}e{}'.format(value[:-1], conv[value[-1]])
  return float(value)

Example:

>>> parse_number('1337')
1337.0
>>> parse_number('8.1k')
8100.0
>>> parse_number('8.1M')
8100000.0
>>> parse_number('64.367G')
64367000000.0
share|improve this answer
    
+1 very nice trick with float(10e3) – fabrizioM Mar 30 '12 at 4:24
    
I assume you'd use this along with the converters kwarg? – Cuadue Apr 18 '12 at 22:10

You could use the function by Niklas B. in the convertd argument of csv2rec:

>>> data = mlab.csv2rec(infile, names=['datetime', 'values'],
...                     convertd={'values': parse_number})
>>> data
rec.array([(datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 1), 8100000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 2), 64800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 3), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 4), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 5), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 7), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 8), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 9), 84800000.0),
   (datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 24, 9, 7, 10), 84800000.0)], 
  dtype=[('datetime', '|O8'), ('values', '<f8')])
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