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UIScrollViewDelegate has got two delegate methods scrollViewDidScroll: and scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation: but neither of these tell you when scrolling has completed. scrollViewDidScroll only notifies you that the scroll view did scroll not that it has finished scrolling.

The other method scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation only seems to fire if you programmatically move the scroll view not if the user scrolls.

Does anyone know of scheme to detect when a scroll view has completed scrolling?

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See also, if you want to detect finished scrolling after scrolling programatically: stackoverflow.com/questions/2358046/… –  Trevor Jul 7 '11 at 2:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 48 down vote accepted

The methods you're looking for are scrollViewDidEndDragging:willDecelerate: and scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:. The first one is always called after the user lifts their finger. If they scrolled fast enough to result in deceleration, willDecelerate will be YES and the second method will be called after deceleration completes.

(From the UIScrollViewDelegate docs.)

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2  
It looks like that only works if it is decelerating though. If you pan slowly, then release, it doesn't call didEndDecelerating. –  Sean Clark Hess Nov 1 '10 at 23:00
3  
Though it's the official API. It actually doesn't always work as we expect. @Ashley Smart gave a more practical solution. –  Di Wu Jun 14 '11 at 8:45
    
I edited the answer to clarify this case, Sean. –  Adam Ernst Nov 8 '11 at 16:22
    
Works perfectly and the explanation makes sense –  Steven Elliott Dec 18 '12 at 23:59
    
This works only for scroll that are due to dragging interaction. If your scroll is due to something else (like keyboard opening or keyboard closing), it seems like you'll have to detect the event with a hack, and scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation is not useful either. –  Aurelien Porte Oct 15 '13 at 10:32

The 320 implementations are so much better - here is a patch to get consistent start/ends of the scroll.

-(void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)sender 
{   
[NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self];
    //ensure that the end of scroll is fired.
    [self performSelector:@selector(scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation:) withObject:nil afterDelay:0.3]; 

...
}

-(void)scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    [NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self];
...
}
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solved my drag - vs scroll end problem. Thanks! –  Alex Milde Jan 28 '11 at 11:22
    
+1 LOL for the comment. –  Alan May 18 '11 at 23:59
    
The only useful answer at SO for my scroll problem. Thanks! –  Di Wu Jun 14 '11 at 8:43
    
Yup. This solution is genius. –  Steven Elliott Sep 15 '11 at 18:50
3  
should be [self performSelector:@selector(scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation:) withObject:sender afterDelay:0.3] –  Brainware Jul 21 '13 at 2:19

I think scrollViewDidEndDecelerating is the one you want. Its UIScrollViewDelegates optional method:

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView

Tells the delegate that the scroll view has ended decelerating the scrolling movement.

UIScrollViewDelegate documentation

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Er, I gave the same answer. :) –  Suvesh Pratapa Jun 14 '09 at 17:46
    
Doh. Somewhat cryptically named but its exactly what I was looking for. Should have read the documentation better. Its been a long day... –  Michael Gaylord Jun 14 '09 at 18:07
    
This is the right answer. –  Hahnemann May 12 '13 at 15:57

For all scrolls related to dragging interactions, this will be sufficient:

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    _isScrolling = NO;
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView willDecelerate:(BOOL)decelerate {
    if (!decelerate) {
        _isScrolling = NO;
    }
}

Now, if your scroll is due to a programmatic setContentOffset/scrollRectVisible (with animated = YES or you obviously know when scroll is ended):

 - (void)scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation {
     _isScrolling = NO;
}

If your scroll is due to something else (like keyboard opening or keyboard closing), it seems like you'll have to detect the event with a hack because scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation is not useful either.

The case of a PAGINATED scroll view:

Because, I guess, Apple apply an acceleration curve, scrollViewDidEndDecelerating get called for every drag so there's no need to use scrollViewDidEndDragging in this case.

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This has been described in some of the other answers, but here's (in code) how to combine scrollViewDidEndDecelerating and scrollViewDidEndDragging:willDecelerate to perform some operation when scrolling has finished:

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    [self stoppedScrolling];
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView 
                  willDecelerate:(BOOL)decelerate
{
    if (!decelerate) {
        [self stoppedScrolling];
    }
}

- (void)stoppedScrolling
{
    // done, do whatever
}
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I only just found this question, which is pretty much the same I asked: How to know exactly when a UIScrollView's scrolling has stopped?

Though didEndDecelerating works when scrolling, panning with stationary release does not register.

I eventually found a solution. didEndDragging has a parameter WillDecelerate, which is false in the stationary release situation.

By checking for !decelerate in DidEndDragging, combined with didEndDecelerating, you get both situations that are the end of scrolling.

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I've tried Ashley Smart's answer and it worked like a charm. Here's another idea, with using only scrollViewDidScroll

-(void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)sender 
{   
    if(self.scrollView_Result.contentOffset.x == self.scrollView_Result.frame.size.width)       {
    // You have reached page 1
    }
}

I just had two pages so it worked for me. However, if you have more than one page, it could be problematic (you could check whether the current offset is a multiple of the width but then you wouldn't know if the user stopped at 2nd page or is on his way to 3rd or more)

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I had a case of tapping and dragging actions and I found out that the dragging was calling scrollViewDidEndDecelerating

And the change offset manually with code ([_scrollView setContentOffset:contentOffset animated:YES];) was calling scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation.

//This delegate method is called when the dragging scrolling happens, but no when the     tapping
- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    //do whatever you want to happen when the scroll is done
}

//This delegate method is called when the tapping scrolling happens, but no when the  dragging
-(void)scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
     //do whatever you want to happen when the scroll is done
}
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To recap (and for newbies). It's not that painful. Just add the protocol, then add the functions you need for detection.

In the view (class) that contains the UIScrolView, add the protocol, then added any the functions from here to your view (class).

// --------------------------------
// In the "h" file:
// --------------------------------
@interface myViewClass : UIViewController  <UIScrollViewDelegate> // <-- Adding the protocol here

// Scroll view
@property (nonatomic, retain) UIScrollView *myScrollView;
@property (nonatomic, assign) BOOL isScrolling;

// Protocol functions
- (void)scrollViewWillBeginDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView;
- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView;


// --------------------------------
// In the "m" file:
// --------------------------------
@implementation BlockerViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    CGRect scrollRect = self.view.frame; // Same size as this view
    self.myScrollView = [[UIScrollView alloc] initWithFrame:scrollRect];
    self.myScrollView.delegate = self;
    self.myScrollView.contentSize = CGSizeMake(scrollRect.size.width, scrollRect.size.height);
    self.myScrollView.contentInset = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0.0,22.0,0.0,22.0);
    // Allow dragging button to display outside the boundaries
    self.myScrollView.clipsToBounds = NO;
    // Prevent buttons from activating scroller:
    self.myScrollView.canCancelContentTouches = NO;
    self.myScrollView.delaysContentTouches = NO;
    [self.myScrollView setBackgroundColor:[UIColor darkGrayColor]];
    [self.view addSubview:self.myScrollView];

    // Add stuff to scrollview
    UIImage *myImage = [UIImage imageNamed:@"foo.png"];
    [self.myScrollView addSubview:myImage];
}

// Protocol functions
- (void)scrollViewWillBeginDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    NSLog(@"start drag");
    _isScrolling = YES;
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    NSLog(@"end decel");
    _isScrolling = NO;
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView willDecelerate:(BOOL)decelerate {
    NSLog(@"end dragging");
    if (!decelerate) {
       _isScrolling = NO;
    }
}

// All of the available functions are here:
// https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UIKit/Reference/UIScrollViewDelegate_Protocol/Reference/UIScrollViewDelegate.html
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