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I have this piece of code:

$a = false;
if ($a) 
    echo 'A'; if (false) echo 'B';
  else echo 'C';

The else statement appears to changes "belongship" depending on the value of $a. If it's true, it seems to interpret it as:

if ($a) 
{
    echo 'A';
    if (false) 
    {
        echo 'B';
    } 
    else 
    {
        echo 'C';
    }
}

And prints AC. But if $a = false, it seems to be interpreting it as:

if ($a) 
{
    echo 'A';
    if (false) 
    {
        echo 'B';
    } 
}
else 
{
    echo 'C';
}

And prints C.

Am I missing something here?

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closed as too localized by Brock Adams, animuson, random, kiamlaluno, Joe Mar 30 '12 at 14:26

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
There is no ambiguous code in your first example –  zerkms Mar 29 '12 at 21:02
3  
Questions like this are why people should use braces in all but the simplest situations. (and even then in my opinion) –  Corbin Mar 29 '12 at 21:06
    
Stop and think about this from a state perspective and it becomes obvious as to why your two snippets (the ones that have {}) are happening. That's not how PHP is actually seeing it, that just happens to be logically equivalent to the flow of how PHP is seeing it (conditional on $a). –  Corbin Mar 29 '12 at 21:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your first code reads as

$a = false;
if ($a) {
    echo 'A';
}

if (false) {
    echo 'B';
}
else {
    echo 'C';
}

When you do not use braces, only the next statement (statement, not line) gets executed as part of that control structure. It is not ambiguous as this behaviour is clearly defined in the programming language.

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I see. I confused myself by focusing on something else. Genius. –  NullUserException Mar 29 '12 at 21:16
$a = false;
if ($a) 
    echo 'A'; if (false) echo 'B';
  else echo 'C';

equals to

$a = false;

if ($a) echo 'A';

if (false) echo 'B'; else echo 'C';

because if control structure accepts a statement as a body, see: http://php.net/if

And echo 'A'; is that statement. So the next if is treated as independent piece of code.

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Both sets of results are consistent with the single interpretation:

if ($a) 
{
    echo 'A';
}
if (false) 
{
    echo 'B';
} 
else 
{
    echo 'C';
}

So I would guess that's what it's doing.

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Helps if you get the indentation correct i.e.

$a = false; 

if ($a) echo 'A';

if (false) echo 'B'; 
else echo 'C';

a - false, result is C a - true, result AC

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