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I'm looking for a simple/elegant way to grep a file such that every returned line must match every line of a pattern file.

With input file

acb
bc
ca
bac

And pattern file

a
b
c

The command should return

acb
bac

I tried to do this with grep -f but that returns if it matches a single pattern in the file (and not all). I also tried something with a recursive call to perl -ne (foreach line of the pattern file, call perl -ne on the search file and try to grep in place) but I couldn't get the syntax parser to accept a call to perl from perl, so not sure if that's possible.

I thought there's probably a more elegant way to do this, so I thought I'd check. Thanks!

===UPDATE===

Thanks for your answers so far, sorry if I wasn't clear but I was hoping for just a one-line result (creating a script for this seems too heavy, just wanted something quick). I've been thinking about it some more and I came up with this so far:

perl -n -e 'chomp($_); print " | grep $_  "' pattern | xargs echo "cat input"

which prints

cat input | grep a | grep b | grep c

This string is what I want to execute, I just need to somehow execute it now. I tried an additional pipe to eval

perl -n -e 'chomp($_); print " | grep $_  "' pattern | xargs echo "cat input" | eval

Though that gives the message:

xargs: echo: terminated by signal 13

I'm not sure what that means?

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way using perl:

Content of input:

acb
bc
ca
bac

Content of pattern:

a
b
c

Content of script.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

## Check arguments.
die qq[Usage: perl $0 <input-file> <pattern-file>\n] unless @ARGV == 2;

## Open files.
open my $pattern_fh, qq[<], pop @ARGV or die qq[ERROR: Cannot open pattern file: $!\n];
open my $input_fh, qq[<], pop @ARGV or die qq[ERROR: Cannot open input file: $!\n];

## Variable to save the regular expression.
my $str;

## Read patterns to match, and create a regex, with each string in a positive
## look-ahead.
while ( <$pattern_fh> ) { 
    chomp;
    $str .= qq[(?=.*$_)];
}

my $regex = qr/$str/;

## Read each line of data and test if the regex matches.
while ( <$input_fh> ) { 
    chomp;
    printf qq[%s\n], $_ if m/$regex/o;
}

Run it like:

perl script.pl input pattern

With following output:

acb
bac
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A bash(Linux) based solution

#!/bin/sh
INPUTFILE=input.txt #Your input file
PATTERNFILE=patterns.txt # file with patterns
# replace new line with '|' using awk
PATTERN=`awk 'NR==1{x=$0;next}NF{x=x"|"$0}END{print x}' $PATTERNFILE`
PATTERN="($PATTERN)"
PATTERNCOUNT=`wc -l $PATTERNFILE | awk '{print $1}'`
# build regex of style :(a|b|c){3,}
PATTERN="$PATTERN{$PATTERNCOUNT,}"

egrep "${PATTERN}" ${INPUTFILE}
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Another way is to read all the input lines and then start filtering by each pattern:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $in, '<', 'input.txt' or die $!;
my @matches = <$in>;
close $in;

open my $ptn, '<', 'pattern.txt' or die $!;
for my $pattern (<$ptn>) {
  chomp($pattern);
  @matches = grep(/$pattern/, @matches);
}
close $ptn;

print @matches;

output

acb
bac
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Using Perl, I suggest you read all the patterns into an array and compile them. Then you can read through your input file using grep to make sure all of the regexes match.

The code looks like this

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $ptn, '<', 'pattern.txt' or die $!;
my @patterns = map { chomp(my $re = $_); qr/$re/; } grep /\S/, <$ptn>;

open my $in, '<', 'input.txt' or die $!;
while (my $line = <$in>) {
  print $line unless grep { $line !~ $_ } @patterns;
}

output

acb
bac
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@downvoter: please let me know if there are any problems with my answer so that I can make any necessary corrections. –  Borodin Mar 30 '12 at 0:15
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Not grep and not a one liner...

MFILE=file.txt
PFILE=patterns
i=0
while read line; do
  let i++
  pattern=$(head -$i $PFILE | tail -1)
  if [[ $line =~ $pattern  ]]; then
    echo $line
  fi
  # (or use sed instead of bash regex:
  # echo $line | sed -n "/$pattern/p"
done < $MFILE
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