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I have a HTML page with markup code like this:

<a href="#!/series/3078/series-name">
  <span class="title">This is series # 1</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

<a href="#!/series/3079/series-name-2">
  <span class="title">This is series # 2</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

<a href="#!/series/3080/series-name-3">
  <span class="title">This is series # 3</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

I need to get the number after "/series/" and the text of the inner span of class "title".

How can I do this with a regex on PHP?

Thanks for your help

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closed as too localized by Jon, Halcyon, Brad, Jeff B, Robert Harvey Mar 29 '12 at 22:56

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@tchrist I respectfully disagree. Regexes on HTML have basically have one use where they don't work at all, which is validating user inputted HTML to search for <script> tags and such (cf "samy is my hero"), and one use which they're extremely good at, which is getting lists and such out of HTML pages. But when you want to get information from the DOM, as in this case (something out of an <a> tag + text from a specific child <span>) then regexs are no longer applicable. I'd use beautiful soup to do this, I don't know what PHP has for that. –  cha0site Mar 29 '12 at 22:12
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@cha0site You can be respectful and still be wrong, which you are. There is no reason whatsoever not to use a text editor on HTML. People do it all the time. –  tchrist Mar 29 '12 at 22:16
1  
@Qtax: True. But isn't it kind of embarrassing that Stackoverflow can only offer a dated and technically not overly correct joke page for explaining alternatives to newbies? –  mario Mar 29 '12 at 22:33
1  
@tchrist I think the appropriate Latin here is Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi. You can obviously handle parsing anything with regular expressions. You literally wrote the book on it. However, when someone asks "I'm trying to parse HTML with regexs, and can't figure it out", the proper answer is "OK, don't do that, use a parser instead", instead of adding another special case to the regex. Because HTML parsers are not quite but almost as common as regex libs, and they're just so very good at parsing HTML. –  cha0site Mar 29 '12 at 22:47
1  
@tchrist "If they can use a regex in a text editor, they can use the same regexes outside of a text editor" - No, this is wrong. That a solution is appropriate in one context doesn't make it correct in another. A text editor, where you're looking at some very specific garbage and want to transform it into the garbage you want, is one context. A PHP script, which sits on a webserver and just processes garbage without you ever manually massaging the input, is another context. A regex is fitting for the first case, and if you know something about the input you'll get, the second. But generally? –  cha0site Mar 29 '12 at 22:56

4 Answers 4

Easy as Pi

Here is a little Perl program that demonstrates how easy it is to use regexes on little bits of HTML of very regular and known composition.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
$_ = do { local $/; <DATA> };    
while ( m!/series/(\d+)!g ) {
    print "Series $1: ";
    if ( m!<span class="title">(.*?)</span>!g ) {
        print $1;
    }
    print "\n";
}    
__END__
<a href="#!/series/3078/series-name">
  <span class="title">This is series # 1</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

<a href="#!/series/3079/series-name-2">
  <span class="title">This is series # 2</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

<a href="#!/series/3080/series-name-3">
  <span class="title">This is series # 3</span>
  <span class="info">bla bla bla</span>
</a>

When run, that program prints out:

Series 3078: This is series # 1
Series 3079: This is series # 2
Series 3080: This is series # 3

See how easy that is? Nothing to it.

The same patterns will work with PHP, because I’m not doing anything that only Perl and not PCRE does.


On the other hand...

Isn’t too hard to construct input that will mess up this particular approach. Then again, it’s also not hard to compensate for that, too, as I have shown here and here, amongst other places.

People edit HTML using text editors all the time. This is perfectly normal. And when they do so, they use regular expressions. It’s not like one program is blessed and another is cursed when they are doing the same thing. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to do do the exact same operation as you would do in your text editor from within a different program that is not your text editor.

However, for all but the simplest things (like this problem here, which counts as very simple), there is a trade-off, and most people asking how to do it are not able to do so. I have a longer discussion about this paradox here.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, it's not hard if you like writing your own "parsers" in regex. And have fun dealing with all the details of "not so valid HTML" parsing. –  Qtax Mar 29 '12 at 22:34
1  
@Qtax As it happens, I do enjoy such. But the problem specification as provided is a very limited one, one whose regex solution is trivial and self-apparent — and perfectly sufficient. To go off writing some massively overengineered behemoth to do a full parse to set up the entire tree just to do the simple extraction I have shown above is extreme idiocy. The invention of HTML did not obsolete such long-standing tools as grep and vi, and to pretend otherwise does a disservice to all. Solve the problem at hand, and don’t overengineer, and you’ll get to have supper with your family. –  tchrist Mar 29 '12 at 22:40
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@tchrist +1 merely for that comment. I don't use perl much but my love of regular expressions is as strong as that of a perl guru such as yourself (I'd use regexes to make my dinner if I could). Most who cry Tony the Pony (and I have done so myself before) suggest an XML parser as an alternative, which makes just as many assumptions — namely that it's valid XML. Invalid XML and inconsistent code blocks can be catered for in either solution, but that doesn't mean to say a priori that one solution is better than the other. So if the OP asks for regexes, why not give ’em a regex? –  cmbuckley Mar 29 '12 at 22:51
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@cha0site The regex for a verb immediately followed by a plural noun is \w+/VB\S* \s+ \w+/NNP?S — using standard Penn Treebank tags. :) The definiteness question is harder, because Penn tags aren’t in general rich enough; e.g. demonstrative adjectives also make a noun definite. Yes, I’ve done this sort of work, and this is actually a place where I argue that you must have the full parse structure available, that regexes are too hard to do it right given arbitrary recursion. That doesn’t stop people from using regexes to 1,$s/foo/bar/g on their letter to Mom, or their dinner menus. –  tchrist Mar 29 '12 at 23:27
1  
@cha0site My personal rule of thumb is that if it is HTML I haven’t seen before, meaning I can’t visually inspect it, I always use a parser. If I can look at it, then it depends on the complexity of the problem. For simple greppy things, I don’t see why to bother. –  tchrist Mar 30 '12 at 0:22

Whether regexs are a right tool for this job or not depends on what the job actually is. If you have a big HTML page, or a set of them, and you want to extract information from them, then regexs might be an OK fit. However, if your inputs are not under your control, then regexs are simply not what you want.

Anyway, the proper way to do this with PHP is just to parse the html using DOMDocument::loadHTML, and just use the DOMDocument you get from that to getElementsByTagName and iterate over that. Maybe even use XPath if you're feeling fancy. That would always be a more robust tool than regexs for parsing HTML, unless you've actually written an HTML parser in regexs.

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Here: (EDITED!)

preg_match_all($links, '/\/series\/([\d]+)\/.*?<span class="title">(.*?)<\/span>/ism', $matches);

var_dump($matches);

Hope that helps. I would suggest looking into DOMDocument in PHP however. I think it would be a cleaner solution. Regex tends to be ugly and slow.

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If your markup is much longer than the snippet you've posted, then regex isn't the way to go as it is very expensive computationally.

(You can't fully parse XML with regular expressions anyway).

What I suggest is that you parse the markup with an XML parser which will let you traverse the tree structure it represents. This will allow you to get at the data you need easily.

If the href attributes always look like #!/series/XXXX/series-name-2 then you access the XXXX through simple string parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course you can fully parse XML with regular expressions — perferably using several of them and auxiliarly logic to control them. –  tchrist Mar 29 '12 at 23:10
    
@tchrist. No, no you can't. XML is not a regular language. You might want to read up on Regular Language Theory. –  Griffin Mar 30 '12 at 0:23
    
Don’t teach your granny to suck eggs. And read what I wrote much more carefully, because you misunderstood it altogether. You very moist certainly can and do use regexes to pull out tokens to lex your input, even if that input is XML. How in the world do you think these things are done? And beyond that, modern patterns ARE NOT YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S NAMBY-PAMBY regular LANGUAGES! Modern patterns are fully equivalent to a context-sensitive recursive-descent parser, including the patterns used in PHP. Go read the references I included in the bottom of my answer. –  tchrist Mar 30 '12 at 0:26

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