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I am getting into c++ from a heavy java background.

How do you have constants associated with a class? If it was Java it would be something like

public class Example{
    public static final int CONSTANT = 0;
}

public static void main (String[] args){
    System.out.println(Example.CONSTANT);
}

And the result would be just 0.

In c++ I have figured so far:

class Example{
    const int LEVEL_INF;
}

Is this correct?
Even by ISO 98?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
class Example{
    const int LEVEL_INF;
};

is not per class, but per instance. You need to make it static:

class Example{
    static const int LEVEL_INF;
};

The advantage of static const integral types is that you can initialize them inside the class, not necessarily outside:

class Example{
    static const int LEVEL_INF = 1337;
};

Also, add public if you want public access to it.

EDIT: As per @ildjarn's suggestion, to initialize it outside the class:

//header.h
class Example{
    static const int LEVEL_INF;
};

//implementation.cpp

const int Example::LEVEL_INF = 1337;
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This will be fine only until he needs to ODR-use LEVEL_INF, at which point it will need an out-of-class definition, so I think it's worth demonstrating how to do that here. –  ildjarn Mar 29 '12 at 23:05
    
@ildjarn true, edited. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 29 '12 at 23:06
    
the iso 98 standard has no implications on this? –  kotoko Mar 29 '12 at 23:20
    
@kotoko : The C++98 standard as opposed to what? This is valid C++98, C++03, and C++11. –  ildjarn Mar 29 '12 at 23:22
    
ok, that was what I wanted to know. –  kotoko Mar 29 '12 at 23:45
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For the sake of completeness, here's another way to do it other than static const:

class Example
{
    // Anonymous enum
    enum { LEVEL_INF = 0; };
};
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As long as it is an integral constant, like int, you can do it much like in Java

class Example {
public:
    static const int LEVEL_INF = 0;
};
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