Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working in Python. I have the following code:

while not is_suffix(pattern[:k], pattern[:q]):
    k -= 1
    print k

def is_suffix(potential_suffix, text):
    print "|" + potential_suffix + "|" + text + "|"
    for i in range(len(text)):
        if potential_suffix == text[i:]:
            return True
    return False

(The while loop is actually in a function, but I've omitted the non-relevant code). The result is that the while loop goes forever. The is_suffix function works when it can find two non-empty strings that are equal. However, in the case that I am having trouble with, it arrives at the end of the for loop and tries to compare text[i:] (which is empty) and potential_suffix, which is empty in this case. The code reaches the end and returns False, which causes the while loop to continue forever.

I claim that the two are empty strings because of the print line within is_suffix, which prints out "|||" in the relevant case.

Is there something fundamental I'm missing? Why would two empty strings not be considered equal?

share|improve this question
2  
Are you familiar with the .endswith method, and what text.endswith(potential_suffix) and text.endswith(tuple_of_suffixes) do? –  DSM Mar 29 '12 at 23:34
    
@DSM this should be an answer, not a comment, because it is the right answer. :) –  Josh Bleecher Snyder Mar 30 '12 at 1:41
    
@DSM No sir, I was not familiar. I am now! Many thanks. –  Paragon Mar 30 '12 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you never go through the for loop if text="". Then, len(text) == 0, and range(0) == [], so there's nothing to loop over. You probably want to either do an extra iteration of that loop:

for i in range(len(text) + 1):

or explicitly check for an empty suffix:

if suffix == "":
    return True

at the beginning of the function.

However, you're doing a lot of extra work in that function, since the loop is unnecessary. The following will do what you want:

def is_suffix(potential_suffix, text):
    return potential_suffix == text[-len(potential_suffix):]
share|improve this answer
    
The range was exactly the problem. I was thinking it was a more fundamental lack of knowledge! Thanks. And about the extra help, I appreciate it, but there is some added functionality to go into it (requiring the extra code). I just needed to get the basics down. –  Paragon Mar 29 '12 at 23:44
2  
The loop is honestly quite silly; there's obviously only one possible value of i for which a match could occur. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 29 '12 at 23:53

The reason I think you are exiting your is_suffix() function with False instead of True when you think its comparing two empty strings is because of your range(len())

for i in range(len(text)):
        if potential_suffix == text[i:]:
            return True

If text is an empty string, then len(text) == 0, and range(0) == [] so you never actually do a loop there since the list is empty.

You could change it quickly to this and see if it works:

if potential_suffix == text:
    return True
for i in xrange(len(text)):
        if potential_suffix == text[i:]:
            return True
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.