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I was learning Adam Drozdek's book "Data Structures and Algorithms in C++", well, I typed the code in page 15 in my vim and compiled it in terminal of my Ubuntu 11.10.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

struct Node{
    char *name;
    int age;
    Node(char *n = "", int a = 0){
        name = new char[strlen(n) + 1];
        strcpy(name, n);
        age = a;
    }
};

Node node1("Roger", 20), node2(node1);
cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;
strcpy(node2.name, "Wendy");
node2.name = 30;
cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;

But there's some error:

oo@oo:~$ g++ unproper.cpp -o unproper
unproper.cpp:15:23: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’ [-Wwrite-strings]
unproper.cpp:16:1: error: ‘cout’ does not name a type
unproper.cpp:17:7: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘(’ token
unproper.cpp:18:1: error: ‘node2’ does not name a type
unproper.cpp:19:1: error: ‘cout’ does not name a type

I have searched this,this,this and this, but I can't find the answer.

Any help would be appreciated:)

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3  
Where's main()? –  Makoto Mar 29 '12 at 23:26
    
PHP developer, I see –  ta.speot.is Mar 29 '12 at 23:28
1  
You're missing your main. The code is outside of a function and is considered by the compiler to be either a declaration of variables, class, structs or other such commands. Just put all of the bottom code into int main() –  Shingetsu Mar 29 '12 at 23:29
    
thanks:) I'm a Python developer:) –  pvd Mar 30 '12 at 1:37
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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that the code you have that does the printing is outside of any function. Statements in C++ need to be inside a function. For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

struct Node{
    char *name;
    int age;
    Node(char *n = "", int a = 0){
        name = new char[strlen(n) + 1];
        strcpy(name, n);
        age = a;
    }
};


int main() {
    Node node1("Roger", 20), node2(node1);
    cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;
    strcpy(node2.name, "Wendy");
    node2.name = 30;
    cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;
}

Hope this helps!

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You are missing the function declaration around your program code. The following should solve your error:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

struct Node{
    char *name;
    int age;
    Node(char *n = "", int a = 0){
        name = new char[strlen(n) + 1];
        strcpy(name, n);
        age = a;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Node node1("Roger", 20), node2(node1);
    cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;
    strcpy(node2.name, "Wendy");
    node2.name = 30;
    cout << node1.name << ' ' << node1.age << ' ' << node2.name << ' ' << node2.age;
}

The error you then get (something like "invalid conversion from int to char*") is because you try to set an integer value (30) to a string attribute (name) with

node2.name=30;

I think

node2.age=30;

would be correct.

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If you want to use cout outside the function you can do it by collecting the value returned by cout in boolean.see the below example

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

bool b=cout<<"1";

int main()
{

return 0;

}

output:- stdout

1

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main() function is missed.There should be a main() function in C++ ,and you should put cout into a function.

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