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I'm trying to implement something like a data visualizer similar to the following two screenshots (gnome-system-monitor):

enter image description here enter image description here

As you can see this is a simple line plot of some network traffic, which gets updated every second. But instead of updating the plot once a second, I would like to plot 'realtime' data every 10ms or so. Because I will end up plotting a lot of data points, I decided to use vertex buffer objects (VBOs) so that data only needs to be uploaded once to the GPU. But even using VBOs, performance can vary a lot, and therefore I was wondering what the best approach for implementing this is. So far I came up with the following scenarios:

  • split graph up into many segments, so that each segment is mapped to a single VBO. After receiving some new data, I will delete the first VOB (the one that will be moved out of the graph to the left), create a new VBO and upload the new data. Then I will shift the 'camera' with glTranslatef and finally re-render the scene
  • same as before, but instead of deleting a VBO and creating a new one, I will bind the old one and upload new data into it

since going through a large list of VBOs and rendering the contents takes a very long (many gl* calls), I was also considering the following two approaches:

  • create one VBO for all data points in the graph. Once we get new data, I get access to the data on the GPU using glMapBuffer. I will then rotate the data so that the first few points are at the end. I would then overwrite those points at the end of the new incoming data
  • create for example 5 VBOs: one which holds data for majority of the screen. And four remaining once which hold data for the last four packages of incoming data. This way I could always just rotate through the 4 last VBOs and update the last one with new data. But I would also have to rotate the data in the big VBO.

Are there maybe better ways of implementing what I plan to do? How can I minimize the amount of gl* calls so that I get something like 100FPs? Is that even realistic (with let's say 300000 points)?

EDIT: I understand that I can't really render 300000 data points. However, this is not my question. My question is really how to update this much data most efficiently. With approach one and two I get something like 10FPS which is an extremely low number.

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2 Answers 2

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split graph up into many segments, so that each segment is mapped to a single VBO. After receiving some new data, I will delete the first VOB (the one that will be moved out of the graph to the left), create a new VBO and upload the new data. Then I will shift the 'camera' with glTranslatef and finally re-render the scene

No, keep the data in one VBO, but don't try do draw the whole thing at a time. You can perfectly well draw only subsets of data. Also VBO recreation is a costly operation. Just update it.

same as before, but instead of deleting a VBO and creating a new one, I will bind the old one and upload new data into it

Better, but make sure to use only glBufferSubData and only update changed data points, not the whole thing.

create one VBO for all data points in the graph. Once we get new data, I get access to the data on the GPU using glMapBuffer. I will then rotate the data so that the first few points are at the end. I would then overwrite those points at the end of the new incoming data

Why so complicated? Just offset the base index into the VBO and draw from there.

create for example 5 VBOs: one which holds data for majority of the screen. And four remaining once which hold data for the last four packages of incoming data. This way I could always just rotate through the 4 last VBOs and update the last one with new data. But I would also have to rotate the data in the big VBO.

You can do this with a single VBO perfectly well. Just try to see the VBO as some bunch of memory you use only slices of.

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thanks for your detailed answer! Could you please elaborate more on the Just offset the base index into the VBO and draw from there. part? I think I understand what you mean, but I don't know how to implement this. thanks! –  memyself Mar 30 '12 at 8:04
    
Just use a nonzereo data parameter to gl…Pointer function. The zero you normally use is just the index to the very first element. Or, if you're using glDrawArrays start of a nonzero base index. –  datenwolf Mar 30 '12 at 8:09
    
ah, you mean glVertexPointer? This way I will effectively draw everything from the specified offset until the end, correct? But that way (if I keep shifting the pointer) I will render less and less data points. Or am I missing something here? –  memyself Mar 30 '12 at 8:14
    
@memyself: Just render a subset of the VBO and switch the offset inbetween. Also if you hit the end, since you can't roll over, split it into two drawing calls with different offsets. You don't have to draw the whole thing in one single call. As soon as a single drawing call batches more than 500 points you're good. Actually batching more than ~10000 points will have a negative impact on performance. –  datenwolf Mar 30 '12 at 9:54

Your screen probably has about 2000 pixels horizontally. So your plot will only have at most 2000 distinguishable data points on screen at any given time. That's not a huge amount of data. Have you tried the naive approach of just transferring it all with every frame, and determined that that doesn't perform well enough, before trying to be clever about complex management of VBOs?

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+1 for "KISS", which is always a good starting position for a new problem :D –  Bethor Mar 30 '12 at 5:36
    
I understand that my screen doesn't have more than 2000 pixels, however as a learning exercise I'm trying to plot 300000 points (I assume that most of them will end up on top of each other?). And yes, I've already implemented approach one and two and I get something like 10 FPS. I'm therefore wondering whether approach three and four would give me better performance. –  memyself Mar 30 '12 at 6:56
    
@memyself I just wanted to check that you've tried the simple solution first. Just one more question: have you tried downsampling from your 300,000 points to a more reasonable number? As you say in your update, you're wondering how to update that much data efficiently; but in general, the most efficient way to do something is not to do it at all. If you can avoid trying to plot far mar points than you can see, you generally should. I'll let someone more knowledgeable, like datenwolf, describe how to manage the data if you really do need to deal with that much. –  Brian Campbell Mar 30 '12 at 15:39

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