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I've been dealing with a frustrating problem recently. I have a lot of reflection code I'd like to hide in macros. These COMPONENT_x() macros are used to like so:

class ComponentBase : public IComponent
{
    COMPONENT(ComponentBase)
};

class ComponentDerived1 : public ComponentBase
{
    COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived1, ComponentBase)
};

The above is completely valid. However, I would like a compile error to occur in this case:

class ComponentDerived2 : public ComponentDerived1
{
    COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived2, ComponentBase)
    //                                   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    // This type claims to have a superclass of ComponentBase in the above macro,
    // but we really derive from ComponentDerived1.
    //
    // I want this to result in a compile error. 
};

That is, when I'm claiming that my super class (or my base class) is ComponentBase when my the super class is actually ComponentDerived1, I would ideally like a compile-time error.

The reason I cannot easily detect this case is that while my super class is ComponentDerived1, that class' super is ComponentBase — and thus it is also one of my base classes. (I understand that ComponentDerived1 is-a ComponentBase, so maybe there is a better phrase to use than "base class.")

There were some comments questioning why I want to do this. I'm using an optimized system of component generation which puts all objects of the same type into discrete buffers, so generating knowledge of class relationships is important if I want to have an API such as getComponentsThatImplement(ComponentDerived1::getType());.

I had hacked together one solution that works with g++:

class ComponentBase : public IComponent
{
    COMPONENT(ComponentBase)

protected:
    static void helperComponentBase(); // COMPONENT(ComponentBase)
};

class ComponentDerived1 : public ComponentBase
{
    COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived1, ComponentBase)

private:
    using ComponentBase::helperComponentBase; // COMPONENT_DERIVED(..., ComponentBase)
};

class ComponentDerived2 : public ComponentDerived1
{
    COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived2, ComponentBase)

private:
    using ComponentBase::helperComponentBase; // error: this function is already hidden
}

Unfortunately, clang with Xcode 4.3.2 seems to not support using in this way. I've check boost's type traits library and don't see anything useful. I am using C++11, so I can use modern constructs.

Any other clever ideas?

share|improve this question
    
So what are the COMPONENT_X macros for? Could you post their definition? –  mfontanini Mar 30 '12 at 0:14
1  
What is the point of these macros? It seems like you're just immediately re-expressing the explicit inheritance relationship in the form of a macro; I don't see how this helps you. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 30 '12 at 0:14
1  
You should explain what you are actually trying to obtain from the macro. BTW, the whole I want to hide in macros goal seems... well probably not the best idea. What do you intend on expressing with those macros? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 30 '12 at 0:16
    
I'm not convinced that the usage of macros deserves too much scrutiny here since a templated member variable will have similar problems. The macros create functions like getType() and getTypeName(). There are other options here but the point of this implementation is to avoid cache misses for performance. (This is for an iPhone game.) I've posted the macros here: codepad.org/l5mfhWMh –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 0:28
    
@ildjarn It's true that I'm not attempting to use polymorphism, though I am not misunderstanding it and I do address your point in my post — down to the phrase "ComponentDerived1 is-a ComponentBase." –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 0:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can exploit the fact that from a c'tor you cannot directly call your super's super's c'tor:

enum PATERNITY_TEST_ENUM { PATERNITY_TEST }; 

#define COMPONENT(CLASS) \
public: CLASS(PATERNITY_TEST_ENUM) { } private:

#define COMPONENT_DERIVED(CLASS, SUPER) \
public: CLASS(PATERNITY_TEST_ENUM) : SUPER(PATERNITY_TEST) { } private:
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great idea, and I forgot about this constraint. Notably, this will prevent default constructors from being generated, but with C++11 we can prevent that with CLASS() = default; –  John Jensen Mar 31 '12 at 0:14

You can definitely use type_traits for this. Throw in a compile-time assert and you'll have it. Here's some code that should work:

#define PARENTCHECKER_THING(__TYPE,__BASE)                     \
inline void WastedFunc()                                       \
    { COMPILE_ASSERT( (std::is_base_of<__BASE,__TYPE>().value == true) ); }


#define COMPONENT(__TYPE)                                               \
    bool __TYPE##SomeFunc(bool val) { return val; }                     \
    bool __TYPE##SomeOtherThing(bool val) { return val; }

#define COMPONENT_DERIVED(__TYPE,__BASE)                                \       
    bool __TYPE##SomeFunc( bool val) { return val; }                    \
    bool __TYPE##SomeOtherThing(bool val) { return val; }               \
    PARENTCHECKER_THING(__TYPE,__BASE);

class Base
{
    COMPONENT(Base);
    int baseData;
};

class NOT_Base
{
    COMPONENT(NOT_Base);
    int garbage;
};

class Child : public Base
{
protected:
    COMPONENT_DERIVED(Child,NOT_Base);

    float childData;
};

Admittedly, the base checker only needs to some base class and not the immediate base. I suppose I could have also been a little more clever about not adding a bogus function in there. It should be dead-stripped though.

Hope this helps!

EDIT: Hmmm...I missed the sentance in the middle where you called this out as a problem. How about this then:

#define PARENTCHECKER_THING(__TYPE,__BASE)                     \
inline void WastedFunc()                                       \
    { COMPILE_ASSERT( (std::is_same< std::common_type<__BASE,__TYPE>()::type, __BASE >().value == true) ); }

Essentially, "Assert if the common type of the base and the child is something other than the base". Unfortunately, I don't have a copy of VS2010 handy, and VS2008 doesn't support common_type<>.

share|improve this answer
    
This will work for many cases, but in the exact case I have above it will fail. is_base_of<ComponentBase, ComponentDerived2,>::value is true. I'm really looking for a is_parent_class_of or is_super_class_of. :) –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 1:23
    
Yeah, I saw that shortly after I posted initially. Damn my skimming eyes! Ok...edit edit edit...how's that? :-) –  Jason Weiler Mar 30 '12 at 1:35
    
Hmm, I think this will work. However: 1. C++11's stdlib doesn't seem to be in a working state in Xcode, so I can't use standard library features; and, 2. clang doesn't currently seem to support decltype and I can't use boost, so I don't think I can actually get this to work for me. :( –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 1:57
    
Oops, I guess it won't work. –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 17:40
    
Yeah...upon reflection, it's really no better than just using _is_base_of<>. –  Jason Weiler Mar 30 '12 at 18:59

This is a pretty simple way of doing this, maybe I am missing something, but couldn't you just stub in a dummy function (that you will never use) that raises the compiler error with simple pointer assignment:

#define COMPONENT_DERIVED(__TYPE,__BASE) \
    // your code here                    \
    void ensureBase()                    \
    {                                    \
         // compiler error:              \
         __BASE* foo = this;             \
         // to ensure __TYPE as well:    \
         __TYPE* bar = this;             \
         // to prevent compiler warning: \
         foo = bar;                      \
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This will compile for the example above when I don't want it to compile. –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 17:41

I don't know if this is too much of a hack for your taste, but it might do the trick. Tested in vs 2010. You would need to fold the static functions into your reflection macros.

This creates an error on ComponentDerrived2: ComponentDerived1::__ComponentBase : cannot access private member declared in class ComponentDerived1

class IComponent {
};

class ComponentBase : public IComponent
{
    //COMPONENT(ComponentBase)
protected:
    static void __ComponentBase() { };
};

class ComponentDerived1 : public ComponentBase
{
    //COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived1, ComponentBase)
protected:
    static void __ComponentDerived1() { __super::__ComponentBase(); };
private:
    static void __ComponentBase() { };
public:

};

class ComponentDerived2 : public ComponentDerived1
{
    //COMPONENT_DERIVED(ComponentDerived2, ComponentBase)
protected:
    static void __ComponentDerived2() { __super::__ComponentBase(); }
private:
    static void __ComponentBase() { };
public:

};
share|improve this answer
    
__super is a VC++ extension, so it won't be very helpful for the OP's iPhone game. –  ildjarn Mar 30 '12 at 0:42
    
Unfortunately __super is not available on my platform. With __super, you can use is_same (boost docs). Thanks for the response. –  John Jensen Mar 30 '12 at 0:43
    
Ah thanks, yeah that makes this more of a challenge. –  ElectricJack Mar 30 '12 at 0:46

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