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these are the sample data :

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE CourseList AS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(64);

CREATE TABLE department (
courses  CourseList)
NESTED TABLE courses STORE AS courses_tab;

INSERT INTO department (courses)VALUES (CourseList('1','2','3'));
INSERT INTO department (courses)VALUES (CourseList('4','5','7'));
INSERT INTO department (courses)VALUES (CourseList('1','2'));

commit;

 select d1.courses
from department d1
where not exists (select 1 from department d2 
  where d1.courses<> d2.courses and d1.courses submultiset of d2.courses);

commit;

Result:

CourseList(1,2,3)
CourseList(4,5,7)

The query returns the correct data, CourseList that are not subset of any other CourseList of the table.

Some idea on how to do it without the subquery, I think that it can be done using join with the same table but i don´t know how to do it.

Thanks.

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3 Answers

I prefer your subquery, myself. But an alternative is:

select d.courses
from department d
MINUS
select d2.courses
from department d2, department d1
where d1.courses<> d2.courses
and d1.courses submultiset of d2.courses;
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just curious, when would it be practical to use submultiset? –  cctan Mar 30 '12 at 2:43
    
um... when you need to know if one set is a submultiset of another? –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 30 '12 at 6:48
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A "not exists" query can be expressed as a join using the anti-join pattern.

select d1.courses
from department d1
left join department d2
   on d1.courses <> d2.courses
  and d1.courses submultiset of d2.courses
where d2.sources is null

The idea is to try to outer self join using the same condition as inside your not exists clause, and then in the where clause only keep the rows where no such join existed.

I usually use the primary key in the where clause. It's required that the column not permit nulls (so that you can tell that there wasn't a match).

Using an anti-join is sometimes faster, and it can make it clearer what indexes might help, but it can also be confusing to read if unfamiliar with the pattern.

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Not tested but this might be what you're looking for:

select d1.courses
from department d1
cross join department d2
where d1.courses<> d2.courses 
and d1.courses not submultiset of d2.courses;
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