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From a python list of tuples (which is essentially a cartesian product of a list with itself) I want to delete (a,b) if (b,a) is in the list.Only one of (a,b) or (b,a) must be retained. So a list

[(1,1),(1,2),(1,3),(2,1),(2,2),(2,3),(3,1),(3,2),(3,3)] 

must reduce to

[(1,2),(1,3),(2,3)]

(Although deleting (1,2) and retaining (2,1) is fine)

I tried doing this but I am not sure about deleting from a list while iterating over it. This doesn't work. (Gives me [(1, 2), (2, 1), (2, 3), (3, 1), (3, 3)])

[pairs.remove((a,b)) for (a,b) in pairs if ((b,a) in pairs)]
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2  
Never mutate the list you're iterating on. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 30 '12 at 1:07
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why delete the incorrect ones from the list?

Use itertools.combinations to generate the correct ones instead.

>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.combinations((1, 2, 3), 2))
[(1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 3)]
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Not exactly what I asked for but I exactly what I need.Must always remember to look into itertools. –  atlantis Mar 30 '12 at 1:18
    
@atlantis: This seems like a case of XY problem (: –  Niklas B. Mar 30 '12 at 1:19
    
There is literally nothing itertools can't do. I'm pretty sure world hunger can be solved with an itertools one-liner. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 30 '12 at 5:08
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>>> [el for el in pairs if el[0] < el[1]]
[(1,2),(1,3),(2,3)]
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pairs = [(1,1),(1,2),(1,3),(2,1),(2,2),(2,3),(3,1),(3,2),(3,3)] 
new_pairs = []

for a, b in pairs:
    if (a, b) in new_pairs or (b, a) in new_pairs:
        pass
    else:
        new_pairs +=  [(a,b)]

new_pairs = [(1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 2), (2, 3), (3, 3)]
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downvoter ... ? –  juliomalegria Mar 30 '12 at 2:37
    
Wasn't me, but probably because this doesn't eliminate tuples where both values are the same. fraxel's answer is also simpler, and you should just use append instead of +=. –  agf Mar 31 '12 at 10:54
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