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I need a reference counter for an object not allocated on the heap.

I need it to implement a RAII mechanism on objects that cannot be easily copied and destructed:

class File
{
private:
    int fd;
public:
    File( const std::string &path ) ... // opening file
    destroy( );                         // actually closing file

    File( const File &f ) ...           // just copying the fd
    ~File( );                           // doing nothing
}

For a scenario like this a std::shared_ptr is usually used: the constructor and the destructor of the object whose pointer is shared are called only once.

In my case, however, I'd prefer avoiding allocating the object on the heap. I'd need a shared_object class that does a job similar to std::shared_ptr, so that my class' non-copy-constructor and destroy function (in the example above) are called only once.

Does anything like this exist?

share|improve this question
    
@NiklasB. the destructor needs to do some reference counting. shared_ptr already has all that logic built-in. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 30 '12 at 1:44
    
@R. Martinho: Thanks, just realized that too. A second glance at the code can never hurt (: –  Niklas B. Mar 30 '12 at 1:46
    
Where do you plan to maintain the reference count if not on the heap? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 30 '12 at 1:50
    
"RAII mechanism on objects that cannot be easily copied and destructed" You can't have RAII without a destructor. So you've already broken RAII. What's wrong with either forbidding copying explicitly and using proper RAII semantics in File? –  Nicol Bolas Mar 30 '12 at 1:54
2  
You're wasting your time and needlessly complicate simple things by trying to reinvent mechanisms already provided by language. Just use shared_ptr<File> and be done with it. Your File class, however, has broken logic: destroy must be exterminated and its functionality should be moved into destructor. destructor must close fd if it has been opened. Copying file descriptors is bad idea, because once something closes copied fd, everything will break. While copying, you should open file again, or use OS-specific functions to duplicate file handle. Or you could make copy-constructor private. –  SigTerm Mar 30 '12 at 2:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to have shared pointer behavior while allocating nothing in dynamic storage ("on the heap") you can look at various smart pointer implementation strategies. In Modern C++ Design, the author discusses many of these strategies in the "Smart Pointers" chapter, which is freely (and legally) available online.

The technique you will be interested in is reference linking. Using this technique, the smart pointer objects are linked together in a bi-directional doubly linked list instead of pointing to a dynamically allocated reference counter.


All that being said, using a std::shared_ptr, std::unique_ptr or their Boost variants will probably be much faster to write and easier to maintain. If dynamic allocation and the reference count are ever a bottleneck (I doubt it will be, but then we can't generalize too hastily), you can always take time to use a custom reference linking version instead.

share|improve this answer

You could provide your own deleter to a std::shared_ptr that will call your custom destroy function instead of delete.

class File
{
private:
    int fd;
public:
    static void destroyThis(File* f){f->destroy();}
    File( const std::string &path ) ... // opening file
    void destroy( );                         // actually closing file

    File( const File &f ) ...           // You probably don't need this anymore.
    ~File( );                           // doing nothing
};

File fileObj("path");
std::shared_ptr<File> pf(&fileObj,std::bind(&File::destroyThis,std::placeholders::_1));
std::shared_ptr<File> pf2(pf);
share|improve this answer

I believe the following architecture meets your requirements:

// pseudo-code
class File
{
private:
    int fd;
    File* prev;
    File* next;
public:
    File(const std::string &path) :
        fd(open(path)),
        prev(0),
        next(0)
    {}

    void destroy()
    {
        close(fd);
    }

    File( const File &f )
         fd(f.fd),
         prev(&f),
         next(f.next)
    {
         if (next)
             next->prev = this;

         f.next = this;
    }


    ~File()
    {
         if (prev)
            prev->next = next;

         if (next)
            next->prev = prev;

         if ((!prev) && (!next))
            destroy();
    }
};

A doubly linked-list is maintained between duplicate File instances. The last member of the list, and hence the last duplicate calls destroy. No heap allocation required.

(Obviously this isn't thread safe. You can protect with a mutex, or you can use lock-free methods for maintaining the list.)

share|improve this answer
    
Missing operator=, modifying members in const object in copy constructor, etc. –  André Caron Mar 30 '12 at 5:03
    
@AndréCaron: Thanks, not intended to be a finished product. Just a quick scribble to convey the architecture. const_cast can be used to modify next and prev, and operator= implementation is straightforward. –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 30 '12 at 6:35
    
The more idiomatic way is to declare the next and prev members as mutable rather than use const_cast<>(), but my point was just that you should mention the fact that it's incomplete in the post. –  André Caron Mar 30 '12 at 14:11
    
@AndréCaron: Yes mutable works too ofc. Ok done, I call it an architecture and label it pseudo-code. –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 30 '12 at 19:37

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