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Below I am trying to loop 100 times using bne, but I want to modify the code so that it runs in faster. Perhaps somehow removing the nop? How should I improve this code?

addi $1, $0, 100
addi $2, $0, 0
lw $3, 0($4)
add $2, $2, $3
addi $4, $4, 4
addi $1, $1, -1
bne $1, $0, -5
nop
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first thing you could do is make use of the branch delay slot. The nop is getting executed on every loop but not accomplishing anything. Why not put the instruction that increments $4 in there (since you don't need it for the loop calculation)?

The second step in running faster is looking at dependent instructions. For example, adding $3 to $2 must wait until the lw has completed, which may take several machine cycles. Subtracting 1 from $1 doesn't need to wait for anything. If you reverse the order of those two instructions, you could be doing that subtraction while the load is still in progress instead of waiting for it to complete (this is architecture-dependent and may not show up on all systems, particularly on simulators).

The third step is to re-architect your loop. You're incrementing a pointer ($4) and decrementing a loop counter ($1) on each loop. Why not combine them? You know what $4 is at the start, and you know what $4 will be at the end ($4 + (4 * 100)). So you can increment $4 and see if it reached the end. That should save you one instruction per loop.

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Your code: (optimized)

    addi $1, $0, 100
1:  addi $2, $0, 0         #can replace with mov $2,$0   (easier to understand)
    lw $3, 0($4)           #don't need an offset, replace with lw $3,($4)
    add $2, $2, $3
    addi $4, $4, 4
    bne $1, $0, 1b
    addi $1, $1, -1

I've removed the nop and swapped the bne and addi instructions so that the cpu doesn't waste any cycles. The addi is always executed in the branch delay slot.

PS Variable length coder mentions that the add instruction must wait for lw and he is partially correct and partially incorrect. If the architecture supports forwarding then you don't have to wait(stall), as do some implementations of the MIPS architecture. However, if the architecture doesn't support forwarding(unlikely) then you would have to either do what he/she suggested or swap the two add instructions following the lw

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An architecture where the CPU runs significantly faster than the RAM and that doesn't have the requested value in the cache will to have to stall on a data load regardless of forwarding. –  Variable Length Coder Apr 3 '12 at 1:06
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