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I'm even stated surprised about jQuery's dumb way to put a hover attribute on an element. Take a look at this sample CSS:

div.test
{
   width: 20px;
   height: 20px;
   color: #000000;
   background: #FFFFFF;
}
div.test:hover
{
   color: #FFFFFF;
   background: #CC0000;
}

If we'd like to convert this to jQuery, we have to type the following:

$('div.test').css({
   'width' : '20px',
   'height' : '20px',
   'color' : '#000000',
   'background' : '#FFFFFF'
});
$('div.test').hover(function() {
   $(this).css({
      'color' : '#FFFFFF',
      'background' : '#CC0000'
   });
}, function() {
   $(this).css({
      'color' : '#000000',
      'background' : '#FFFFFF'
   });
});

Arn't there any better way to do this? It feels stupid to write obvious things.

Thank you in advance.

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4 Answers 4

I suppose another way to go would be the following:

// In you stylesheet, just define the default properties
div.test
{
   width: 20px;
   height: 20px;
}

Then, make a simple object wrapper to hold the properties you want to use

var hoverHelper = (function () {
   var styles = {
      hoverStyle: {
         'color' : '#FFFFFF',
         'background' : '#CC0000'
      },
      defaultStyle: {
         'color' : '#000000',
         'background' : '#FFFFFF'
      }
   };

   return {
      init: function (selector) {
         $(selector).hover(
            function () {
               $(this).css(styles.hoverStyle);
            },
            function () {
               $(this).css(styles.defaultStyle);
            }
         );
      }
   };
}());

hoverHelper.init('.hoverElementClass'); // Apply the hover functions
                                        // to all matching elements

This way, at least you keep the style definitions in one place.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll see what I can do. Thank you! –  Ivar Jun 15 '09 at 21:43

Also you could just write the following simple plugin to do what you want (automatic unhovering):

$.fn.easyHover = function(cssProps){
   return this.each(function(){
       var $t = $(this);
       var oldProps = {};
       for(x in cssProps)
          oldProps[x] = $t.css(x);
       $t.hover(function(){
          $(this).css(cssProps);
       }, function(){
          $(this).css(oldProps);
       });
   }
}

You could then use it like this:

$('#elem').easyHover({color:'#000', background:'#ccc'});

However Praveen's answer is defenitly the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
This is more like what I'm looking for, but it seems like it's not working? –  Ivar Jun 14 '09 at 20:17

Where you're mistaken is in thinking jQuery tries to replace CSS.

jQuery doesn't "add a hover tag", it merely provides handlers for JavaScript's hover event (IIRC it's actually an abstraction of mouseover/mouseout). If you want to emulate CSS's hover pseudo-selector with JS, jQuery makes it easy for you by giving you an easy-to-use event handler binding.

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2  
Exactly, JQuery isn't magic. –  Soviut Jun 14 '09 at 20:12
    
I'm not new with jQuery and I know the way it works. What I mean is that jQuery is so smart in all ways except this simple point. –  Ivar Jun 14 '09 at 20:16
    
@lvarska: There are many people trying to help you both practically and conceptually, yet you remain indignant. What's up with that? –  Chris Farmer Jun 14 '09 at 20:21
    
@Chris: Yeah, it feels like you guys underrate me and think I'm dumb, and that annoys me since I multiple times tries to explain what I really mean. Anyway, I really appreciates your time. –  Ivar Jun 14 '09 at 20:38
1  
jQuery isn't CSS. jQuery allows applying CSS dynamically, that's all. If you use the :hover pseudo-selector in jQuery, you get the same elements that would be affected by a CSS rule at that exact moment. What the browser does is that it checks the DOM tree every time it changes to update the styling according to the stylesheet. If jQuery did this, it would be emulating the browser IN the browser. It's easy to see why this is a bad idea. So instead, it only provides you with a really easy-to-use shortcut to bind event handlers. Fair enough, no? –  pluma Jun 14 '09 at 20:41

You're approaching this the wrong way. You'd define a CSS class like so

.highlighted
{
   color: #FFFFFF;
   background: #CC0000;
}

$('div.test').hover(function() {
    $(this).addClass('highlighted');
}, function() {
    $(this).removeClass('highlighted');
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm just able to JavaScript at this moment. And this is exactly the same thing in exception that you've put the style attributes in a CSS class instead. Thank you anyway. –  Ivar Jun 14 '09 at 20:06
10  
What does "just able to Javascript" mean? You can't CSS your page? What kind of ridiculous restriction is that? The accepted, correct way of doing what you're asking is exactly what is described here. Messing around with direct CSS styles instead of classes is not even remotely needed for this situation... –  Paolo Bergantino Jun 14 '09 at 20:08
4  
He's not "just putting the style attributes in a CSS class", he's putting the CSS in a stylesheet and manipulating the element's classes instead of its styling. That's called abstraction and saves you time. I suggest you learn some best practices in seperation of style, behaviour and content, mate. –  pluma Jun 14 '09 at 20:11
2  
Firstly, please watch your tone. You weren't being very clear about your problem, so don't be offended if people do not follow. Secondly, it's mostly a bad idea to hard-code the styling in JavaScript (separation of style and behaviour, and all that shtick), hence the suggestion to use a class to be applied to the hovered element (kinda like the :hover pseudo-selector). That way you can re-use your code for other hover effects AND you only have one place to look if you want to change the styling: your stylesheet, where it SHOULD be. –  pluma Jun 14 '09 at 20:45
1  
@micmcg: Sorry, but what is it you don't understand? I've already told you my reason to make a module completely in JS. I've worked with websites in five years and I know that it's not the "correct" way to do it, but in this case it seems to be the best way and I see no problem with using JS to style something that's made of JS to optimize loading time and structure. And about my "attitude", it seems like you can't handle a critical person. I'm not angry, I'm just arguing. If you could peruade me then go ahead, but stop with these "attitude" attacks. So let's just get back on topic, shall we? –  Ivar Jun 15 '09 at 8:57

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