Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't figure out how to do this.

The question: Implement the function

int count_matches(const string arr[], int size, string query); 

Return the number of strings in the array that are equal to query or -1 if size if less than 0.

My answer:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int count_matches(const string arr[], int size, string query){

  int i = 0;
  int numMatches;

  for (;i<size;i++) {

    if (string[i] == (string[i]+1)){
      numMatches++;
    }

  }

  return numMatches;

}


int main(){

  string selection;

  const string array[4]={"dog", "cat", "dog", "dog"};

  cout<<"which animal do you want?"<<endl;
  cin>> selection;

  cout<< "there are " << count_matches(array, 4, selection)<< " matches"<<endl;

  return 0;
}

What is wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Your array name is arr, so what is string[i]? Also, look at string[i]+1 and think about what its doing, also since int numMatches; is uninitialized, what do you think numMatches++; will do? And where do you use query? –  Jesse Good Mar 30 '12 at 3:22
    
You don't use the query variable at all. I don't that's probably what you intended... Oh and you probably should initialize numMatches... –  mcmcc Mar 30 '12 at 3:23
    
how do i "reinitialize" numMatches? –  user1145538 Mar 30 '12 at 4:05

2 Answers 2

int count_matches(const string arr[], int size, string query){

  int numMatches(0);

  for (int i=0; i<size; ++i)
  {
    if (arr[i] == string)
    {
      ++numMatches;
    }
  }

  return numMatches;
}

This should be a solution to your problem but you will never learn anything from gaining the answer this way. I'd advise reading this tutorial on arrays and loops to better understand how to tackle the problem next time.

share|improve this answer

Once you get your code to compile, you need to look carefully at this block:

if (string[i] == (string[i]+1)) {
    numMatches++;
}

What do you actually want to compare here? string is a type. Take another look at the arguments that you pass into the function and that should make it clear.

Then, once you have a match, you increment numMatches. But what value does this have to start with? What value should it have to start with?


Note that std::count() does exactly what your count_matches() function should do:

std::count(array, array + 4, selection)

This will probably not statisfy whomever marks your homework, but it is worth playing with and learning if you want to advance your C++ skills.


Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.