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In XSLT 1.0, what is the shortest/cleanest/recommended way to pass the current context node to a called template and have that node become the context node inside the called template?

It would be nice (it would, right?) if a template with no xsl:param and called by an empty call-template would simply pick up the caller's context node, but the best I can think of is this:

    <xsl:call-template name="sub">
        <xsl:with-param name="context" select="." /> 
    </xsl:call-template>

with

<xsl:template name="sub">
    <xsl:param name="context" />
    <xsl:for-each select="$context">

    </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:template>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It would be nice (it would, right?) if a template with no xsl:param and called by an empty call-template would simply pick up the caller's context node.

This is exactly how xsl:call-template is defined in the W3C XSLT 1.0 (and 2.0) specification, and implemented by any compliant XSLT processor.

Here is a small example:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:template match="a">
  <xsl:call-template name="currentName"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="currentName">
  Name: <xsl:value-of select="name(.)"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>
 <a/>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

  Name: a
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Thanks Dimitre. I didn't see this documented and it didn't seem to work when I tried it. I wasn't looking in the right place and must have been doing something else wrong. +1 Q answered. Cheers. –  JPM Mar 30 '12 at 13:37
    
@JPM: You are welcome. You might have been looking at the xsl:function instruction in XSLT 2.0 -- it is different than a named template in that it doesn't receive the context of the caller of the function and if the caller has to pass its context node as a parameter, if this context node must be passed. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 30 '12 at 13:56

Just otherway of explaining what Dimitre said.

When you call a template from a node, you are already there in that node,

example:

assume this code:

<xsl:template match="MyElement">
    <xsl:call-template name="XYZ"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="XYZ>
    <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl>

The above code is as good as writing:

<xsl:template match="MyElement">
    <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

You can use for-each loop in the called template as well. :)

But just be sure where you exactly are ..

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