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I'm writing the javascript on FireFox 11 with a text editor. In the follow case, "var n=this.val" becomes "undefined". How to get the local value in the original class object?

<html>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script>
var Test = {
    val : 0,
    begin: function(v){
        this.val = v;
        this.recieve();
    },
    complete: function(o){
        var n = this.val;   // undefined
    },
    recieve : function(){
        $.ajax({
            url : "http://www.yahoo.com/",  // Dummy
            type: "POST",
            dataType: "json",
            complete: this.complete,
            timeout: 1000,
        });
    },
};

var c = Object(Test);
c.begin(10);
</script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Because complete is a callback the scope has changed and this doesn't refers to the object called Test. You only need to replace this with Test in the complete function:

    var n = Test.val;

=== UPDATE ===

Your question was "How to get the local value in the original class object?". My answer shows you how to get the field of your static object.

If you need a shared object you should change the structure to:

function Test() {
    var self = this;
    this.begin = function(v) {
        this.val = v;
        this.recieve();
    }
    this.complete = function(o) {
        var n = this.val;
    }
    this.recieve = function() {
        $.ajax({
            url : "http://www.yahoo.com/",  // Dummy
            type: "POST",
            dataType: "json",
            complete: function(data) {
                self.complete(data);
            },
            timeout: 1000,
        });
    }
}

Now you can create two different objects:

var c2 = new Test2;
c2.begin(10);
var d2 = new Test2;
d2.begin(20);
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, Test.val will be overwritten. var c = Object(Test); c.begin(10); var d = Object(Test); d.begin(20); – Tank2005 Mar 30 '12 at 14:09
    
I've updated my answer. – scessor Mar 31 '12 at 8:37
    
It works fine. Thank you. – Tank2005 Apr 6 '12 at 1:06

complete: this.complete.bind(this)

This won't work in old IE versions, but with some effort (adding es5 shim code) one can make it working even there.

complete function is executed in context of ajax request. If you write such code:

var method = Test.complete;
method();

this is not preserved, you just get the link to the function. name1.name2() has a trick in js. Not only name2 should be a property of name1 and be a function, but it (name2) is also executed in context of name1.

var x = 'outer', b = {
    x: 'inner',
    a: function() { return this.x; }
};
[(b.a)(), (m = b.a)()] // ["inner", "outer"]
share|improve this answer

Inside complete handler this is not Test. Common solution is to create a proxy variable for it.

recieve : function(){
    var proxy = this;
    $.ajax({
        url : "http://www.yahoo.com/",  // Dummy
        type: "POST",
        dataType: "json",
        complete: function(){
              proxy.complete();
        },
        timeout: 1000,
    });
},

or ( in this case ) simply Test.val inside function complete

complete: function(o){
    var n = Test.val;   
},
share|improve this answer

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