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I don't know if this question has been ask before. But I have a problem when concating varchars.

Let me explain:

I have this table:

CREATE TABLE Table1
(
    [Field] [varchar](10) NOT NULL
)
INSERT INTO Table1
VALUES('1'),('2'),('3'),('4'),('5'),('TITLE')

And I like the output to be like this:

'[TITLE],[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]'

I want the 'TITLE' to be order first then 1,2,3,4,5

So this query will return the ordered result. I do not have more numbers then the length of the 'TITLE'

SELECT
    *
FROM
    Table1
ORDER BY
    LEN([Field]) DESC,
    [Field] ASC

Then i usually concat the varchar like this:

DECLARE @cols VARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT  @cols = COALESCE(@cols + ','+QUOTENAME([Field]),
                     QUOTENAME([Field]))
FROM
    Table1
ORDER BY
    LEN([Field]) DESC,
    [Field] ASC

But this return:

'[5]'

Which I find is really strange. Can someone please explain why?

I know that there is a alternative solution to concating a varchar. Like this:

DECLARE @cols VARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT @cols=STUFF
(
    (
        SELECT 
            ',' +QUOTENAME([Field])
        FROM
            Table1
        ORDER BY 
            LEN([Field]) DESC,
            [Field] ASC
        FOR XML PATH('')
    )
,1,1,'')

This will return my expected result like this:

'[TITLE],[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]'

EDIT

Suggestion that @cols is null at the begining cant be it. Becuase if i remove the order by. Like this:

DECLARE @cols VARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT  @cols = COALESCE(@cols + ','+QUOTENAME([Field]),
                     QUOTENAME([Field]))
FROM
    Table1

My result will be like this:

'[1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[TITLE]'

EDIT1

This will not work:

DECLARE @cols VARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT  @cols = COALESCE(@cols + ','+QUOTENAME([Field]),
                     QUOTENAME([Field]))
FROM(
  SELECT [Field]
  FROM
      Table1
  ORDER BY
      LEN([Field]) DESC,
      [Field] ASC
) AS t

Because it will give a exception message like this:

Msg 1033, Level 15, State 1, Line 17 The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP or FOR XML is also specified.

EDIT2

Like I expected. I cannot do this:

SELECT  @cols, @cols = COALESCE(@cols + ','+QUOTENAME([Field]),
                     QUOTENAME([Field]))
FROM
    Table1
ORDER BY
    LEN([Field]) DESC,
    [Field] ASC

Becuase this will raise an exception like this:

Msg 141, Level 15, State 1, Line 9 A SELECT statement that assigns a value to a variable must not be combined with data-retrieval operations.

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain the reasoning about this scenario? Usually when you store numbers in a text field, you're doing it wrong. Also, you would have to be absolutely, positively sure that that table won't grow to 100.000 rows. – SWeko Mar 30 '12 at 7:56
    
I want to just this in a dynamic Pivot. The table is static except a flag that says that it is disabled. Witch I have not include in the example. The table is part of a legacy system which i cannot change. It is for a report an the customer has require it. – Arion Mar 30 '12 at 7:59
    
Why can't you use your second solution? It works as intended. – SWeko Mar 30 '12 at 8:12
    
I just what to know why this do not work. So that I can avoid the if i need to order by. I just think that it has to be a reason why it do not work. – Arion Mar 30 '12 at 8:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can have a look at this article PRB: Execution Plan and Results of Aggregate Concatenation Queries Depend Upon Expression Location

The ANSI SQL-92 specification requires that any column referenced by an ORDER BY clause match the result set, defined by the columns present in the SELECT list. When an expression is applied to a member of an ORDER BY clause, that resulting column is not exposed in the SELECT list, resulting in undefined behavior.

You get a different execution plan when you use expressions in the order by clause.

enter image description here

The sort is applied after Compute Scalar instead of before.

The safe way to concatenate strings with an order by is to use for xml.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that. This is the answer to accept. – Arion Mar 30 '12 at 8:37

I'm not sure, but I think the answer is in the execution order of the query. I've tried the following code:

DECLARE @x INT
SET @x = 0
SELECT  @x =@x + 1
FROM
   Table1
ORDER BY
  LEN(Field) DESC, Field ASC
SELECT @x

and it returns 1, yet

DECLARE @x INT
SET @x = 0
SELECT  @x =@x + 1
FROM
   Table1
SELECT @x

returns 6, which is odd at best.

However, from the first query's execution plan can be seen that the sequence of events is:

Table Scan -> Compute Scalar -> Sort -> Select

so my best guess is that the results are first computed, then sorted, and you end up with some intermediate value.

IMHO, this is an abuse of the SQL server execution engine, and is basically undefined behavior. Even if you manage to get it working on this SQL server, there's no telling if a service pack would break it for you. I would go with the second solution you described, which is straight-forward, and easier to maintain.


About edit1: specifying SELECT TOP 100 PERCENT takes care of the "no ordering in views" error, however, SQL server does some magic, and you still end up with [1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[TITLE]

share|improve this answer
    
Now this it probably a stupid question. But can you change the order so priorities the Compute Scalar first before the Sort? And I agree the alternative solution is probably better. Also in the maintain aspect. – Arion Mar 30 '12 at 8:27
    
In a word, no. You can use table hints to infuence some execution plans, but in general, the execution plan path is an internal SQL server thing. – SWeko Mar 30 '12 at 8:35

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