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Lets say i got couple Objects named as txt1 and another object as lbl1. I have a function that should make changes on both of these objects, like highlighting.

I want to get the value of that object (doesnt matter which object) and than i want to highlight it.

Such as:

Function Highlight(Obj1 As Object, Obj2 As Object)

    MyTxt = Obj1.Text
    Obj1.Text = ""
    Obj1.SetFocus

    MyCap = Obj2.Caption
    Obj2.Caption = ""

End Function

How can i achive that?

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What errors your current (sample) code raises? –  Arvo Mar 30 '12 at 8:35
    
It gives Invalid Qualifier error which means i cant use the object that way. But there must be a way to do it and i want to know how. also i dont understand why a person gives -1 to this question cause i should not know if a function can get any object reference this way or not im just trying and asking if its posible.. –  Berker Yüceer Mar 30 '12 at 9:01
1  
Oh, and don't use Function unless it returns something, and if it does, specify a data type. –  Deanna Mar 30 '12 at 9:11
1  
On what row exactly you get "Invalid Qualifier"? –  Arvo Mar 30 '12 at 9:44
1  
@Berker - If it's not too onerous, could you make use of Option Explicit and declare your variables through-out your project? That "Invalid Qualifier" error means that although the compiler can recognize the identifiers taken piecemeal, it still cannot figure out what object is actually being meant; a case of failed disambiguation. –  rskar Mar 30 '12 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Object does not have a .Text or .Caption property. Change your method to:

Sub Highlight(Obj1 As TextBox, Obj2 As Label)

    MyTxt = Obj1.Text
    Obj1.Text = ""
    Obj1.SetFocus

    MyCap = Obj2.Caption
    Obj2.Caption = ""

End Sub
share|improve this answer
2  
I would be surprised if this is the issue. A VB6 Object implies the use of late-binding - which means it will literally search through the interface of the actual instance at run-time to locate a member by name. –  rskar Mar 30 '12 at 13:10
    
I agree that Late binding should avoid issues with Text and Caption, by I like the answer because it declares the control types. I suggest to the OP Dim MyTxt As String, Dim MyCap As String, and Option Explicit. –  tcarvin Mar 30 '12 at 14:06
    
Thanks now i understand how it happens. –  Berker Yüceer Mar 30 '12 at 15:12
1  
+1 even though strictly the first sentence is misleading. But I agree the OP needs to learn to use early binding first, and learn more advanced topics later. @Berker you should always have an As Type clause on your variable declarations –  MarkJ Mar 31 '12 at 13:17
    
@MarkJ thanks i ll remember that on my next events. –  Berker Yüceer Apr 2 '12 at 6:09

Check out TypeOf:

if TypeOf Obj1 is TextBox then
   Obj1.text = "kkkkkk"
end if
share|improve this answer
    
i just went trough time and needed to look at this issue again and when i see your answer again i felt like: Damn! Why dont i use this? Its really an awesome way to handle many objects in a loop.. –  Berker Yüceer Apr 26 '12 at 11:53

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