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I have a very simple HTML/JS code, which expands the size of a div on mouse over and collapses it again on mouse out. The code looks like this:

CSS:

.sign-in-up {
    position: absolute;
    left: 780px;
    background-color: #8599b2;
    font-size: 9pt;
    line-height: 23px;
    color:white;
    text-align: center;
    height: 25px;        /* note this height 25px */
    width: 164px;
    overflow: hidden;
}

Then I have my div in HTML:

<div class="sign-in-up" id="sign-in-up"
     onmouseover="$(this).css('height','55px')"
     onmouseout= "$(this).css('height','25px')">
     my html goes here
</div>

This works perfectly fine in Firefox (from version 3 and up), Safari, Chrome, Opera and IE9 - but does not work on IE8 or IE7. When I mouse-over the div, visually nothing changes. I tried changing the onmouseover to be

onmouseover="$(this).css('height','55px');alert($(this).height())"

and the alert box shows correct height of 55px, however visually on screen nothing changes and the div is still shown as 25px height.

I've tried every possible thing there is - with exactly the same results. It seems like IE is changing the height of the div in the dom but is not redrawing the div on the screen to match its new height.

At this stage I'm totally lost. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Edit

Thank you all that replied. After much head banging against the wall (computer screen in this case), the issue turned out to be caused by interference from curvycorners - a javascript library to imitate rounded corners (border radius) in older versions of IE. Once it did its job it would actively prevent redraws of the affected elements.

After removing rounded corners, everything works fine, although it looks worse - but at least it works. I'll investigate other options for rounded corners.

share|improve this question
    
Any reason why you're not attaching the handlers unobtrusively ? –  alex Mar 30 '12 at 8:34
    
@alex This is old legacy code (from years ago). It doesn't really matter how the handlers are attached. This is static behaviour for a static piece of html. –  Aleks G Mar 30 '12 at 8:35
2  
Care to explain why this question is downvoted? –  Aleks G Mar 30 '12 at 8:35
1  
+1 to balance downvote. Downvote without commenting is a really bad practice that is totally uncomprehensive. Please, comment when you downvote to help improve the question ! –  Jerome Cance Mar 30 '12 at 8:46
    
@JeromeC. Thank you. I personally always leave a comment when downvoting a question or an answer. –  Aleks G Mar 30 '12 at 8:54

5 Answers 5

Have you tried to do

$(this).height(55)

instead of

$(this).css('height','55px')
share|improve this answer

it's actually working

http://jsbin.com/ebejew

share|improve this answer
    
this is the "but it worked at home" kind of answer –  gion_13 Jul 17 '12 at 14:38

Use this simple jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".sign-in-up").hover(function() {
        $(this).animate({
            height: 55
        }, 10);
    }, function() {
        $(this).animate({
            height: 25
        }, 10);
    });
});​
share|improve this answer

I'd tend to go for a more CSS driven approach. This pulls out your presentation into CSS where it belongs.

#sign-in-up {
    height:25px;
}

#sign-in-up.expanded {
    height:55px;
}

Js

$(this).addClass('expanded');

$(this).removeClass('expanded');
share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thank you all that replied. After much head banging against the wall (computer screen in this case), the issue turned out to be caused by interference from curvycorners - a javascript library to imitate rounded corners (border radius) in older versions of IE. Once it did its job it would actively prevent redraws of the affected elements.

After removing rounded corners, everything works fine, although it looks worse - but at least it works. I'll investigate other options for rounded corners.

share|improve this answer
    
The users of IE 7 cannot expect something looks good... so don't worry to disable all effects, round corners etc. If they want it, they should use a browser. –  TMS Mar 31 '12 at 9:08

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