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Apparently the input data is so. "5 AB 4 2 6 9519CD", but shouldn't the loop run more times? Shouldn't it be once for the first loop, 2 for the second, 3 for the top one again, and finally fourth for the last one? Why doesn't this happen, or does this happen and I am trippen balls.

char word[4];
int  list[4];
int  k;

for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ )
{
    scanf("%d", &list[k]); 
    scanf(" %c", &word[k]); 
    scanf("%c", &word[k]); 
}
for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ )
{
    printf("%c", word[k]); 
    printf("%d", list[3 - k]); 
}
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2  
How about reading the code? It says to run the loop 4 times. Why would you expect anything else from it? –  littleadv Mar 30 '12 at 8:40
    
Well, in your loops k goes from 0 to 3 (inclusive). That's why it only runs four times. Now if you wanted to nest the loops, the second k should become l –  Chetter Hummin Mar 30 '12 at 8:40
    
@AmitBhargava: That is 4 times. –  Alok Save Mar 30 '12 at 8:42
    
@Als Heh, my bad. Have corrected it. Thanks! –  Chetter Hummin Mar 30 '12 at 8:43
    
What is the four-times equivalent of once/twice/thrice? Time to take a trip to our English-use cousin :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 30 '12 at 8:48

4 Answers 4

You have two independent (non-nested) loops there, both of which will run exactly four times, because that's what you told them to do:

for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ )

This will run the body of the loop with k set to 0, 1, 2 and then 3.

It's sounds like the behaviour you're after is one you would get from nested loops where the continuation condition on the inner loop depended on the outer loop value

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    int x, y;
    for (x = 0; x < 4; x++) {
        for (y = 0; y <= x; y++) {
            printf ("x = %d, y = %d\n", x, y);
        }
        puts ("");
    }
    return 0;
}

which will output:

x = 0, y = 0

x = 1, y = 0
x = 1, y = 1

x = 2, y = 0
x = 2, y = 1
x = 2, y = 2

x = 3, y = 0
x = 3, y = 1
x = 3, y = 2
x = 3, y = 3
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Your input generates these values

list[0] <== 5
word[0] <== 'B' overwriting 'A'

list[1] <== 4
word[1] <== ' ' overwriting '2'

list[2] <== 6
word[2] <== '5' overwriting '9'

list[3] <== 19
word[3] <== 'D' overwriting 'C'
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each programming structure runs independently of the other in the sequence you say. So

for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ ) {
    scanf("%d", &list[k]);
    scanf(" %c", &word[k]);
    scanf("%c", &word[k]);
}

Runs first, four times (counting 0 to 3, stopping before 4)

The you next loop runs:

 for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ ) {
     printf("%c", word[k]);
     printf("%d", list[3 - k]);
 } 

Also 4 times.

If you wanted it to run more times you'd change the upper limit for k. But the behaviour you describe (run once, then twice, ...) is completely different. If you're looking for specific behaviour like that and need more answers, comment or edit your question.

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your code is wrong on several points:

char word[4];
int  list[4];
int  k;

for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ )
{
    scanf("%d", &list[k]); 
    scanf(" %c", &word[k]); 
    scanf("%c", &word[k]); 
}
for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++ )
{
    printf("%c", word[k]); 
    printf("%d", list[3 - k]); 
}

which outputs:

$ echo "5 AB 4 2 6 9519CD" | ./test
list[0]: 5
work[0]: A->65
work[0]: B->66
list[1]: 4
work[1]: 2->50
work[1]:  ->32
list[2]: 6
work[2]: 9->57
work[2]: 5->53
list[3]: 19
work[3]: C->67
work[3]: D->68
B19 654D5

so as you can see, your first mistake is to call word[k] two followings times which overwrites the first value each time (and you loose 4 items that way).Then, looking at your string, the code is anyway not relevant. You get the whitespace character, you get characters in a list that seems aimed at containing numbers, and you do it without converting them to in (atoi()).

So about your question : "Shouldn't it be once for the first loop, 2 for the second, 3 for the top one again, and finally fourth for the last one?" I don't even understand how you could think that ? You are doing imperative code, that means you read from top to bottom, except if there's an instruction that makes you go again at the top. And there's no such instruction to run multiple times both loops.

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