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Consider this code:

var img = new Image();

img.onload = function() {
    console.log(this.width);
};

img.src = 'http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Gull_portrait_ca_usa.jpg/800px-Gull_portrait_ca_usa.jpg';

document.body.appendChild(img);

This will print out the image width (800) correctly. But if I apply a max-width using CSS:

img {max-width: 400px}

Test case: http://jsfiddle.net/MSjnM/

The JS code above will print out 400 instead. That is a bit confusing, as one would think that the width attribute represents the original image width, not the computed width.

Now to something even more confusing, if I append the image in the onload event after the width detection I get a different result:

var img = new Image();

img.onload = function() {
    console.log(this.width);
    document.body.appendChild(img);
};

img.src = 'http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Gull_portrait_ca_usa.jpg/800px-Gull_portrait_ca_usa.jpg';

Test case: http://jsfiddle.net/MSjnM/2/

This will print out 800 instead, even though the CSS has applied. I assume it’s because the image is appended after I detected the width and that the max-width will be applied as soon as the image is inserted into the DOM.

OK, so if I want to get the original image size, no matter when or if the IMG element is inserted in the DOM or whatever CSS styles has been applied, how would I do that fail-safe?

share|improve this question
    
using Fx11 and Op11.61 both your fiddle print "400". – fcalderan Mar 30 '12 at 8:51
    
@FabrizioCalderan I was testing in Chrome, but that is even more alarming... – David Mar 30 '12 at 8:51
    
OK I changed the code slightly to get the same effect across browsers, thanks Fabrizio. – David Mar 30 '12 at 8:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

For me: in IE9, Opera, Safari(PC), FF and chrome the naturalWidth/naturalHeight-properties return the desired values

http://jsfiddle.net/MSjnM/5/

share|improve this answer
    
nice, +1: in which IE version is supported? – fcalderan Mar 30 '12 at 9:15
    
IE9 as I wrote. In IE8 width returns 800 for me. – Dr.Molle Mar 30 '12 at 9:20
    
I can also confirm Chrome 20.0 works – Sean Jul 24 '12 at 13:24

Load the image independently into a new Image object and get the width there:

var img = new Image();
img.src = 'http://placehold.it/350x150'
console.log(img.width);
share|improve this answer
    
This is not reliable in Safari. Also, it doesn’t work if the image is present in the DOM and a max-width has been applied. – David Mar 30 '12 at 8:56
1  
Sidenote: the image should be in cache by now, so no extra request / performance loss here. – dirkbonhomme Mar 30 '12 at 8:58
    
@David Thought: is it only unreliable in Safari because you have a CSS rule making all <img>s have a max-width? Surely even if it is applying the CSS rule to an Image() object not in the DOM, so long as you can make the CSS rule more specific, then there won't be a problem? – GregL Mar 30 '12 at 9:02

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