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I will be giving input date time for a timezone and the timezone for the input date time and we want the relevant datetime in the expected timezone.

And here is my method. convertToTimezone("03/08/2010 20:19:00 PM","Asia/Shanghai","US/Central"); The above time is the time in Asia/Shanghai.We would like to know what is the corresponding time in US/Central.

It's working fine but I am getting 1 hour difference from the actual time. Can I know where I am going wrong ?

Here is the code.

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class DateUtil 
{

    private static String format_date="MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss a";

    public static void main(String a[])
    {
        try
        {
            String sourceTimezone="Asia/Shanghai";
            String destTimezone="US/Central";           
            String outputExpectedTimezone=convertToTimezone("03/08/2010 20:19:00 PM",sourceTimezone,destTimezone);
            System.out.println("outputExpectedTimezone :"+outputExpectedTimezone);
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    public static String convertToTimezone(String inputDate,String inputDateTimezone,String destinationDateTimezone)throws Exception
    {
        String outputDate=null;

        SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(format_date);
        format.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone(inputDateTimezone));

        Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone(inputDateTimezone));  
        calendar.setTime(format.parse(inputDate));
        calendar.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND,-(calendar.getTimeZone().getRawOffset()));        
        calendar.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, - calendar.getTimeZone().getDSTSavings());
        calendar.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, TimeZone.getTimeZone(destinationDateTimezone).getRawOffset());

        outputDate=format.format(calendar.getTime());
        return outputDate;
    }

    }
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1 Answer 1

You shouldn't be adding anything to the calendar - that represents a specific instant in time. In fact, you don't need a calendar at all.

Instead, have two different formats, one for each time zone:

public static String convertToTimezone(String inputDate,
     String inputDateTimezone,
     String destinationDateTimezone)
     throws Exception
{
    SimpleDateFormat parser = new SimpleDateFormat(format_date);
    parser.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone(inputDateTimezone));

    Date date = parser.parse(inputDate);

    SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(format_date);
    formatter.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone(outputDateTimezone));
    return formatter.format(date);
}

As an aside, I'd thoroughly recommend using Joda Time instead of the built-in date/time API.

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