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I have written a constuctor

function Human() { 
var legs = 2;
var iq = 100; 
}

Then I create an instance of the object

var Man = new Human();

And want to add a new method

Man.getIQ = function() {
return iq - 10;
}

But I'm told that IQ is undefined. Even if I use this.iq. Why isn't a var inside the scope of an object available for new methods?

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2  
You're attempting to extend Woman, but you need to extend the prototype of Human. –  TJHeuvel Mar 30 '12 at 9:24
    
Sorry, if I offended you guys. But beginners need to learn as well. Didn't know that you hade to experienced to ask questions. –  Runar Mar 30 '12 at 10:48
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The variables legs and iq are simulating a "private" member to the Human class because they are visible only in that closure (only in the Human function).
If you want to access them from outside that scope, you need to make them public by binding them to the this keyword (this.iq=100;) or by implementing getters and setters for each of your private member :

function Human() { 
    var legs = 2;
    this.getLegs = function(){
        return legs;
    };
}

Anyway, these are represent just the very tip of the iceberg; I explained them so that you can understand why what you were trying to do failed.
If I understand correctly what you were trying to do, the right way to write your ideea oop in js would be something like this :

function Human(){}
Human.prototype = {
    legs : 2,
    iq : 100
};  

function Woman(){}
Woman.prototype = new Human;
Woman.prototype.getIq = function(){
    return this.eq - 10;
};

var womanInstance = new Woman();
// needless to say that this line is both wrong and misogynistic
alert('a woman has an iq of ' + womanInstance.getIq());

Sorry if I got carried away, but there are lots of articles & blogs about javascript oop (such as this one) that I recommend you read before/while getting stuck with these kind of problems.

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Thanks @gion_13 That helps a lot. My problem was that I wanted to keep the properties privat so they couldn't be changed. And I thought that a new instance of the class would inherent all variables, methodes, and properties. So that I could make a spesific getter for a privat variable from the original constructor. So if I understand you correctly, I should make a getter for the privat var and use the getter in the instance to mainpulate the private value. for just that instance. –  Runar Mar 30 '12 at 10:50
    
PS: and thanks for giving me a straight and civil answer. –  Runar Mar 30 '12 at 10:55
    
+1 for the iq method, simple, elegant and downright hilarious –  Roderick Obrist Mar 30 '12 at 11:09
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