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In a web app I'm trying to generate a unique thread safe id from a limited id pool. The problem I'm facing is that between reading and writing another thread may already have changed the data structure; this is why I have to resort to compare-and-set!.

(def sid-batch 10)
(def sid-pool (atom {:cnt 0
                     :sids '()}))

(defn get-sid []
  (let [{:keys [cnt sids] :as old} @sid-pool]

    ; use compare-and-set! here for atomic read & write
    (if (empty? sids)

      ; generate more sids
      (if (compare-and-set!
            sid-pool
            old
            (-> old
              (assoc :sids (range (inc cnt) (+ sid-batch cnt)))
              (assoc :cnt (+ cnt sid-batch))))

        ; return newest sid or recur till "transaction" succeeds
        cnt
        (recur))

      ; get first sid
      (if (compare-and-set! sid-pool old (update-in old [:sids] next))

        ; return first free sid or recur till "transaction" succeeds
        (first sids)
        (recur)))))

Is there an easier way to synchronize reads and writes without having to perform STM "by hand" and without abusing a field in sid-pool as a return value from swap!?

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1  
I think you have the right idea with "abusing a field in sid-pool". Except you don't need a field, just call (comp first sids) on the return value from swap!. (the first sid of sid-pool will then always be the just assigned id). –  cgrand Mar 30 '12 at 10:27
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do it with an atom, by adding a field to sid-pool in the way you seem to be suggesting. I agree that's a little gross, but using compare-and-swap! for something so simple is godawful. Instead, use the atom; or a ref, which lets you return whatever you want from a dosync block while still being transactionally safe:

(defn get-sid []
  (dosync
   (let [{:keys [cnt sids]} @sid-pool]
     (if (empty? sids)
       (do 
         (alter sid-pool
                (fn [old]
                  (-> pool
                      (assoc :sids (range (inc cnt) (+ sid-batch cnt)))
                      (update-in [:cnt] + sid-batch))))
         cnt)
       (do
         (alter sid-pool update-in [:sids] next)
         (first sids))))))
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@mikera is right, though - if you just need to generate integer IDs, just use an atom and inc it. I write this out in case you're actually doing something more complicated that can benefit from batching. –  amalloy Mar 30 '12 at 10:18
    
This was actually my first idea but I thought that sid-pool could change between the let clause (where it is dereferenced) and the alter call. So reads / derefs are part of a dosync transaction after all? –  Philip K Mar 30 '12 at 12:52
    
Yes. If you have a dosync that only reads a particular ref, then maybe it's an issue; I never fully understood that scenario. But this one is definitely an isolated, thread-safe transaction. If you're worried, you can try it with an extra Thread/sleep thrown in somewhere. –  amalloy Mar 30 '12 at 18:41
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(def sid-batch 10)
(def sid-pool (atom {:cnt 0
                     :sids '()}))

(defn get-sid []
  (first (:sids (swap! sid-pool
                  (fn [{:keys [cnt sids]}]
                    (if-let [sids (next sids)]
                      {:cnt cnt :sids sids}
                      {:sids (range cnt (+ sid-batch cnt))
                       :cnt (+ cnt sid-batch)}))))))

Like I said in my comment I think you have the right idea with "abusing a field in sid-pool". Except you don't need a field, just call (comp first sids) on the return value from swap!

I removed the inc in the call to range because it caused the generator to skip multiples of 10.

And to return a sid to the pool:

(defn return-sid [sid]
  (swap! sid-pool (fn [{:keys [cnt [_ & ids]]}]
                    {:cnt cnt
                     :sids (list* _ sid ids)})))
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Unfortunately this would leave the newly returned sid in the pool. –  Philip K Mar 30 '12 at 12:53
    
Well, it's a matter of convention, the pool of available ids at any time is (next (:sids @sid-pool)) instead of just (:sids @sid-pool). If it was not ids but referebces to huge objects there would be the potential for memory leaks but not there. It works. –  cgrand Mar 30 '12 at 12:58
    
Yes, I should have been more specific; sids can be returned to the sid-pool at any time. I'm doing this because I need the shortest possible unique number identifier per session - so a sid can not remain in the sid pool, unless I'm missing something obvious :/ –  Philip K Mar 30 '12 at 13:32
    
Updated with return-sid –  cgrand Mar 30 '12 at 13:37
    
re-using sids over a short period of time doesn't sound like a good idea. This is gonna cause you some pain, I suspect. Are you really sure you need to constrain your sids like this? What's the use case? perhaps there's a better solution if we knew more about why. Is this an XY problem? meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem –  sw1nn Mar 30 '12 at 14:07
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Maybe I'm confused about what you are trying to do but the canonical way to create unique IDs in Clojure would simply be:

(let [counter (atom 0)]
  (defn get-unique-id []
    (swap! counter inc)))

There's no need for any complex locking. Note that:

  • The closure encapsulates the let-bound atom so you can be sure that no one else can touch it.
  • The swap! operation ensures atomic safety in concurrent situations, so the get-unique-id function can be shared across different threads.
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Yes, I should have been more specific; sids can be returned to the sid-pool. I'm doing this because I need the shortest possible unique number identifier per session. –  Philip K Mar 30 '12 at 12:55
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